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Posts Tagged ‘state’

Office for the Cultivation of "Beautiful Flowers from the Same Garden: A Reflection on the State Department’s Office of Faith-Based Community Initiatives (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Cara Burnidge

Today's post is a revised crosspost that was originally posted to Cara's blog earlier this month.

This month two important professional events occurred: first, I graduated (thanks to everyone who flew/drove to Tallahassee to help celebrate) and second, the State Department announced a new office devoted to "faith-based organizations and religious institutions." According to the Department, the creation of this office was motivated in part by religious persecution around the world, the presence of violence (curiously disassociated with "religion"--a telling rhetorical move noted below), and the desire to spread religious freedom and expand interfaith dialogue.

As Secretary of ...

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West Virginia Becomes a State (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

In 1863, West Virginia became 35th state admitted to the Union when it broke away from Confederate Virginia during the Civil War. When Virginia seceded from the Union in 1861, the western portion was against the action. On October 24, 1861, what would later become West Virginia was formed. The US government accepted West Virginia as a state two years later.  Interestingly, West Virginia was initially going to be called Kanawha after the Kanawha River.

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Rosenberg’s diary found in New York state 67 years after Nuremberg Trials (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

The diary of high-ranking Nazi Party ideologue Alfred Rosenberg, missing since it was used as evidence in the Nuremberg Trials, has been found in western New York. The 400 loose-leaf pages were written from 1936 through 1944. During the pre-war years he was, among other things, the head of the Nazi party’s foreign affairs department and during the war years he was in charge of looting cultural property all over Europe and, after the invasion of the Soviet Union, he served as Reich Minister for the Occupied Eastern Territories.

Rosenberg was one of the first members of the Nazi ...

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Kansas the Troubled State (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

On January 29, 1861, Kansas became the 34th state to enter the union. Kansas began its path to being part of the United States of America with the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. Thomas Jefferson violated his own beliefs around federal power because the deal with France was too good of an opportunity to pass up. In one sweeping act, Jefferson doubled the size of the United States. 'Bleeding Kansas' was a troubled territory during the Civil War period and gained entry to the union as a free state amidst a great deal of turmoil.

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The State of Swiss Archaeology: Decline Coming? (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

Swiss Info has published an interesting article on the present and future of archaeology in Switzerland. It's not a 'sky is falling' piece, as it outlines why - as they say as the start - Swiss archaeology had been "a shining example to other countries", thanks in no small part to a good amount of funding. However, it also explains the problems with regional variations in how digs are conducted, and sounds a warning note at the end: Swiss archaeologists are worried that new building legislation, coupled with funding cuts, will push a system that is already stretched to breaking ...

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Montana Chippewa Cree agree to use state security interests filing system (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

News From Indian Country, April 2012, at 2, reports that the Chippewa Cree Tribe located in Montana has signed a banking agreement with the state that should help spur economic development on the reservation. The Tribe will use the state Uniform Commerical Code filing system which will help lenders to record and give better notice of security interests they hold over assets located on the reservation.  This should improve tribal and individual Indian access to loans.

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Shinnecock Indian Nation, New York state, and town of Southampton lawsuit headed back to state court (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

A divided federal court of appeals yesterday vacated a trial court ruling that barred a Long Island-based American Indian tribe from building a casino in Southampton, New York.

In a 2-1 ruling, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit held that the dispute between the Shinnecock Indian Nation and New York and the Town of Southampton belonged in state court and not in federal court.
 
The appeals court vacated an earlier Brooklyn federal district court judge's permanent injunction in 2008 that froze the casino project.
 
The Shinnecock Indian Nation was federally recognized in 2010. But in 2003, the tribe had begun constructing a 61,000-square-foot casino ...

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Big Ideas in a Small State: Roger Williams and the 375th Anniversary of the Founding of Providence, Rhode Island (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:


Linford D. Fisher

Well, you missed it. But you’re not alone. I’m talking about the 375th anniversary of the founding of Providence that took place last year, in 2011. The city put forth a valiant effort to celebrate this historical moment, but frankly, even as someone who works in Providence, the year slipped by for me with relatively little fanfare. There was some elation back in June, however, when the city archivist re-discovered the 1648 charter for Providence, which had apparently been lost (mis-filed, really) for decades. Throughout 2011, the city also hosted a series of events, including the ...

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Thatcher State Dinner (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


So after the recent state dinner with the UK, I thought I’d revisit an older UK State Dinner (this includes all the Carter State Dinners if you are interested). On December 17, 1979, President Carter entertained Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. The menu and entertainment was:
Dinner:
Atlantic Halibut with Seafood Sauce
Fleurons
Beaulieu Pinot Chardonnay

Supreme of Pheasant Veronique
Wild Rice with Mushrooms
Brussels Sprouts
Mirassou Gamay Beaujolais

Tossed Green Salad
Brie Cheese

Schramsberg Blanc de Blancs
Yule Log with Sabayon Sauce


Entertainment:
Sarah Caldwell is conducting the United States Marine Corps Orchestra accompanied by nine soloists from the Opera ...

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State Dinner with United Kingdom (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


So what’s on the White House dinner plate for the state dinner?
The theme of President Barack Obama's Wednesday night state dinner for U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron is "America's Backyard." In this case, the backyard is the South Lawn of the White House, which will be viewed by dinner guests through a 150-foot-long glass wall in the dinner tent.


The meal itself builds on the theme of "A Winter Harvest," a reference to vegetables, including lettuce and baby kale, that come from the White House kitchen garden. The year-round fruit and vegetable garden is one of first lady ...

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Washington state supreme court rules for Yakama Indian in fishing prosecution (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

The Supreme Court of Washington, in State v. Jim, decided Feb. 9, 2012, that Lester Ray Jim, an enrolled citizen of the Yakama Nation could not be prosecuted by the State for netting an undersized sturgeon because the act occurred at the Maryhill Treaty Fishing Access Site, land set aside by Congress exclusively for the use of four Columbia River tribes to exercise their treaty fishing rights.

The State mandtained that it had criminal jurisdiction over conduct occurring at Maryhill. The majority of the supreme court disagreed. Instead, that court held that Maryhill is reserved and held by the United States for the exclusive use of tribal citizens ...

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State of the Union con’t (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


One more State of the Union...so here's James K. Polk's from 1846. I found this part, on the Treasury worth posting:
The annual report of the Secretary of the Treasury will exhibit a detailed statement of the condition of the finances. The imports for the fiscal year ending on the 30th of June last were of the value of $121,691,797, of which the amount exported was $11,346,623, leaving the amount retained in the country for domestic consumption $110,345,174. The value of the exports for the same period was $113,488,516, of which $102,141,893 consisted of domestic productions and $11,346,623 of foreign ...

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State of the Union (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


The State of the Union is tonight and you can view an enhanced version here. I was listening to the radio and it was talking about shows being preempted due to this....my kids will have no idea what preemptions are! We DVR everything and we have satellite. I grew up with about 6 channels, no DVR, no cable/satellite.....they have it so soft!

Anyway, I decided to pick a random State of the Union to feature here, so here's part of Harding's 1921 State of the Union:
Every contemplation, it little matters in which direction one turns, magnifies the ...

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Nevada – The Silver State (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

On October 31, 1864, Nevada became the 36th state. This was just a few days before the reelection of Abraham Lincoln. While today, we look at Lincoln as one of our best presidents...

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Leonardo and the Wild State of Thought. (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

I’m currently teaching a course on Leonardo da Vinci called “Leonardo, The Artist’s Studio and the Renaissance World.” It therefore seems a good idea to recycle some of the teaching material as the occasional blog post- my aim is always to reach a wider audience.  My first in this series considers Leonardo’s education and scientific investigations in relation to the renaissance context, part of my first lecture on him: “Introducing Leonardo.”

table_abacus-gregor_reisch_margarita_philosophica_1508 Leonardo’s name has become a byword for bright, shining genius, but those expecting to find an erudite scholar fully conversant in the classics, or even the humanities, might be ...

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Washington state develops tribal sovereignty curriculum (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

The Washington state education system is developing class room materials on tribal sovereignty and a curriculum for teachers to use. Check out “Since Time Immemorial: Tribal Sovereignty in Washington State.” http://indian-ed.org.

For example, one of the units is entitled “The Point No Point Treaty,” and students read information such as “Indian Treaties As Sovereign Contracts” which is currently located at http://www.flashpointmag.com/indtreat.htm

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Oregon legislature grants expanded state powers to tribal police (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

The Oregon legislature narrowly approved a measure yesterday that grants tribal police officers the right to enforce state law off tribal lands, regardless of whether the crime originated on a reservation. Oregon is apparently only the second state to enact such legislation.

According to the Portland Oregonian: “Currently, tribal officers can only enforce state law under very narrow circumstances — such as resisting arrest or in pursuit of a suspect leaving the reservation — or unless a tribal government formed an agreement with individual counties.”

Senate Bill 412 requires that tribal officers complete standard state police training and for tribal ...

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West Virginia Becomes a State (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

In 1863, West Virginia became 35th state admitted to the Union when it broke away from Confederate Virginia during the Civil War. When Virginia seceded from the Union in 1861, the western portion was against the action. On October 24, 1861, what would later become West Viginia was formed. The US government accepted West Virginia as a state two years later.  Interestingly, West Virginia was initially going to be called Kanawha after the Kanawha River.

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A Theological Crisis at the Heart of State Budget Crises (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

by Janine Giordano Drake

In the old days, states would balance their budgets by carefully managing their wealth held in property. Their means of acquiring more wealth was the state militia, and wealth, of course was, control over Indian territory. Indian land seizure could either result in fast money from speculators (usually represented by banks), or a slow, long term income stream garnered by renting to municipalities and land developers. When that was no longer easy, states sold exclusive government contracts to companies that traded with and in the state. What I want to argue here is that raising funds ...

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2011 State of the Union (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


If you missed last night's State of the Union address, you can check it out online. That's the video, here's the transcript. I thought I'd pick out an excerpt on energy from the speech to share:
That’s what Americans have done for over 200 years: reinvented ourselves. And to spur on more success stories like the Allen Brothers, we’ve begun to reinvent our energy policy. We’re not just handing out money. We’re issuing a challenge. We’re telling America’s scientists and engineers that if they assemble teams of the best minds in their fields, and focus on the hardest problems ...

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History of the State of the Union (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


With the State of the Union in the news (it's tonight), I thought a post on its history would be useful. This is actually mandated by the Constitution:
Article II, Section 3 mandates that the president "shall from time to time give to the Congress information of the state of the union, and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient."

This speech though has changed over the years:
A seemingly well-established misconception found even in some academic literature, is that the State of the Union is an orally delivered message presented to ...

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China State Dinner (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


In honor of the recent state dinner for the President of China by the Obamas, I thought I'd go back to the Clinton's state dinner for the then-current Chinese president. By the way, my interesting factoid for the recent state dinner - Michelle Kwan was there (okay, interesting to me...I didn't say it would be to you!). President Clinton was, too, which then segues into my post.

Here's the menu for the Clinton's 1997 dinner:
STATE DINNER MENU
OCTOBER 29, 1997

Chilled Lobster with Corn Leek Relish
Marinated Butternut Squash
LobsterTarragon Sauce

Pepper Crusted Oregon Beef
Yukon Gold Whipped Potatoes
...

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Senator Schumer supports state versus tribe (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

As part of the continuing struggle between New York and various tribal nations located there, several tribes have requested the U.S. to approve taking new lands into trust, which turns them into Indian Country under federal law. See 25 U.S.C. sections 465 & 1151.

Even though the Supreme Court encouraged tribes to take this administrative approach, in lieu of self-help provisions, the state of New York and various counties and cities are vigorouly opposing these attempts.

New York Senator Charles Schumer has joined this debate and is urging federal officials in the U.S. Department of Interior to reject the Cayuga ...

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Florida State University Graduate Symposium (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:



Coming off the 2010 Annual American Academy of Religion meeting, I thought it was especially relevant to blog about the Florida State University Graduate Symposium hosted each year by FSU's religion graduate students. The call for papers has been up on h-net for about a month now, but I particularly wanted to draw the attention of my fellow Americanists.

The Florida State University Department of Religion is pleased to announce its 10th Annual Graduate Student Symposium