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Posts Tagged ‘space’

Lost Landscapes of American Religious History (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Chris Cantwell

The Institutional Church and Social Settlement?
All history is public history insofar as the past leaves so many visible traces upon the landscape. But this is especially true of American religious history. Who can tell the history of rural New England, for example, without considering the meetinghouses that sat so prominently on the town square; or the urban history of American Catholicism without envisioning the church steeples that fought with smokestacks for prominence on a city skyline; or the rise of conservative evangelicalism without showing the megachurches that occupy the strip malls of suburbia. The architectural history of ...

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Joint Space Operations (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

aspaintz

On 17 July 1975, the crews of the U.S. Apollo and Soviet Soyuz docked in space initiating the first manned space flight conducted jointly by the United States and Soviet Union. The primary purpose of the mission, the Apollo Soyuz Test Project, was to test the compatibility of rendezvous and docking systems for American and Soviet spacecraft and to open the way for international space rescue as well as future joint manned flights. It also symbolized a policy of détente that the two superpowers were pursuing at the time and marked the end of the Space Race between the ...

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My First but Hopefully Not My Last RAAC Conference (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Emily Suzanne Clark

Shortly before the 2011 biennial Conference on Religion in American Culture hosted by the IUPUI, I read the published proceedings from the 2009 conference. I then wished Indiana was closer to Florida and waited for the 2011 conference proceedings to be posted. This year, a small contingent of #religinoles made the drive from Tallahassee to Indianapolis for the 2013 conference. It was a fantastic weekend full of good conversations. The in-the-round setup and small attendance gives the conference an intimate feel – almost like a conference panel meets a graduate seminar table. And, just as ...

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Place, Space, and Movement in Historical Research (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Trevor Burrows

I want to use my post today to ask an admittedly broad and open question of this blog’s readers and contributors.  The journal Religion has posted an intriguing preview of a forthcoming issue on the theme of “urban Christianities.”  In the introduction, "Urban Christianities: Place-Making in Late Modernity," James Bielo points to Robert Orsi’s seminal collection on urban religion, Gods of the City, as a jumping-off point for the issue, wherein six authors will consider the theme as presented in a variety of locales ranging from Knoxville, Tennessee, to Lagos, Nigeria.  Considering some of the recent posts ...

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Four Questions with Sarah Pike (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Randall Stephens

This post marks the first in a series of short interviews with religious studies scholars and religious historians who work on American topics. I hope to conduct these interviews with senior, junior, and mid-career scholars from the states and abroad. (Suggestions are always welcome!)

This inaugural interview is with Sarah Pike, a professor in the Department of Religious Studies, California State University, Chico.  Her innovative work will be familiar to many of our readers.  Pike has studied the relationship between religion and ethnicity, identity, and cultural expression.  Along with a variety of articles and book chapters, she ...

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First U. S. Manned Space Flight (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

May 5th, 1961 CDR Alan Shepard Jr. mans first U. S. space flight           Fifty-one years ago, the United States launched its first manned spacecraft, Freedom 7.  The flight, which lasted almost fifteen-and-a-half minutes, marked a monumental step towards the U. S. space program’s goal of placing a man on the moon.  In this, [...]

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Space Shuttle Challenger (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


Tomorrow marks the anniversary of the Space Shutter Challenger diaster and this is actually I date I always remember as it is also my brother's birthday (he turned 3 in 1986, you can do the math on what he is turning tomorrow). So anyway, here is President Reagan's address on the Challanger. He was actually supposed to be giving the State of the Union, but it was postponed due to this tragedy. I like how he included the schoolchildren watching it in his speech. I didn't watch it in 1986 (at least I don't remember and honestly I would have ...

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Apollo 12 Moon Landing (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

November 19th, 1969 Navy astronauts become 3rd and 4th men to walk on the moon. “The impact of man in space and man on the Moon has been felt in almost all segments of our society.  The astronauts are in every sense explorers who have broadened the limits of mankind’s environment . . .”         On [...]

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Disputing Sacred Space in America (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

Kelly Baker

The newest issue of Material Religion: The Journal of Objects, Art and Belief is now available (with a library subscription). For those of unfamiliar with this journal, it is an excellent, interdisciplinary journal that provides cutting edge scholarship on the materiality of religion. Every time the table of contents arrives in my inbox, I stop whatever I am doing to see what the issue holds. The July issue is no different, and it contains a conversation about sacred space in America with Erika Doss, Anthea Butler, Jacob Kinnard, and Edward Linenthal. From outdoor space ...

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Space, Symbol, Dreams & Death in the Artist’s Studio (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

Continuing this series of posts on the artist’s studio with the most speculative one yet. A few themes are explored here; my favourite is the relationship between the painter’s creativity and dreams, a strand of my research.

The Mental Studio

“The studio is no more than a container, a kind of equipment, a room in which to paint or sculpt, a necessary space. In its isolation the artist watches a painting or sculpture, adjusts it, instinctively responsive to pigments, colours and materials, resolving their conflicts, bringing them together. In this way the studio is also an arena in which controlled ...

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