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Posts Tagged ‘presidential’

Utopian Movements in American History (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

The 19th century saw the rise of many utopian movements. Individuals who followed these movements were seeking a different life and hoping for a perfect society. Most of these were founded on the idea of communism and shared responsibility. From these, only the Mormons have continued on, though present day Mormonism is much different from the past. Following is an article that takes a look at the major utopian movements of the 19th century. While most of them failed, many had lasting effects.

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Presidential Religions (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:

This site catalogues the Presidents and their religious associations.  My biggest issue is that the often do several per president, which I get on one level and yet on another, I think they should have picked the one they most identified with.   This site also is a combination of good sources and ones I would never use.  So it is neat and can provide some interesting information, but definitely use with care!

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Presidential BBQ (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:

I was watching a cooking show on BBQ and they quoted George Washington!  So I had to explore!  This is what started it all:
The definition of barbecue (let alone Spelling) is as problematic today as it was in the time of George Washington when he wrote in his diaries, "went in to Alexandria to a Barbecue and stayed all Night" in 1769. I found a much more enlightening quote from the first president written in a letter to Henry Bouquet in 1758 during the French and Indian war. Washington, complaining of a lack of supplies wrote, "That we ...

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Presidential Blunders (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:

What would you rate as the worst presidential blunder? Historians were recently asked this question and ranked Buchanan's inability to stop the Civil War as the top one followed by Andrew Johnson's decision to side with Southern whites after the Civil War.  You can check out the article for the full list.

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Who Pays for Presidential Perks? (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:

This is a neat little piece on the presidential perks and who pays for them!  For instance, what does it cost to run the White House?
Number three – The White House. For the 2008 fiscal year, Bradley Patterson, a retired Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, estimated the cost of running the White House was almost $1.6 billion. And that amount didn’t include unpublished classified expenses.

The president’s White house staff also comes at a steep price. In 2012, the White House reported its payroll grew from $37 million in 2011 to $37.8 million. The list includes 468 names. ...

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Presidential Inauguration Facts (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

Every four years, America experiences the pomp and circumstance of a presidential inauguration. Over the years, a number of traditions have arisen from starting the day at a religious service to ending it at a ball. Learn more with this list of key presidential inauguration fact.

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Presidential Children (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:

So I was reading an article about Jenna Bush Hager's new job at Southern Living and I happened on this other article on a panel of presidentail children talking about their time in the White House. I found the stories from Steve Ford fun and interesting:
Steve Ford garnered laughs during a panel discussion Thursday with fellow children of former presidents as he recalled dragging a stereo onto the roof with a friend his first night there in 1974.

A teenager at the time his father took office, he said, "I think we were playing like Led Zeppelin's 'Stairway to ...

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Presidential Children (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


So I was reading an article about Jenna Bush Hager's new job at Southern Living and I happened on this other article on a panel of presidentail children talking about their time in the White House. I found the stories from Steve Ford fun and interesting:
Steve Ford garnered laughs during a panel discussion Thursday with fellow children of former presidents as he recalled dragging a stereo onto the roof with a friend his first night there in 1974.

A teenager at the time his father took office, he said, "I think we were playing like Led Zeppelin's 'Stairway to ...

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Presidential First Cars (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:

So here's a fun look at presidential cars - and often first cars! Jimmy Carter's first car was a 1948 Studebaker!

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Presidential Campaign Slogans (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

Presidential campaign slogans are an attempt by the campaigns to sum up either something about their candidate or point out deficiencies in their opponent. Over the years, America has seen many slogans from "I Like Ike" to "Change We Can Believe In." This year is no different with Obama's campaign focussing on the slogan "Forward," while Romney's campaign uses "Believe in America." I hope you enjoy reading through my selection of  15 key slogans from historical to present day presidential elections.

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Presidential Conventions (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


It is that time again....so here are some articles on presidential conventions.

First, 10 weird facts! Here's one:
In 1944 President Franklin Roosevelt did not attend the Democratic Party convention that nominated him. Instead, highlighting his duties as a wartime president, he delivered his speech by radio from the San Diego Naval Base while on his way to Pearl Harbor.


You can also go check out LIFE's best GOP convention photos. That 1951 control booth amuses me!  I didn't see a democratic one...anyone find one?

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Top 10 Significant Presidential Elections (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

As the nomination for Mitt Romney seems to be more and more assured, America is heading into its 57th presidential election. Only time will tell how significant this election will be. The following article takes a look at the ten most significant presidential elections in US history.

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Vice Presidential Entertaining (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


In honor of former VP Cheney's heart transplant, I thought I'd do a VP topic.

The Vice Presidents’ residence is a rather new thing, so before that the Vice President simply had quarters somewhere in DC. Garrett Hobart, McKinley’s first Vice President (the one before Teddy Roosevelt), and his wife, Jennie, helped with some of the McKinley’s entertaining at their residence:
Ida McKinley’s epileptic episodes left her confined to the home and unable to perform the typical socialite duties of the First Lady, so it was The Hobarts that generously picked up the slack. Jennie made frequent trips to ...

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Presidential Childrens’ Books (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


I was at the library last week and happened to see this book, Franklin and Winston, and couldn't resist picking it up. I have to say it is nicely written and rather cute. It focuses on the visit of Churchill to the US in December of 1941 (using Christmas to highlight this). I was talking to another lady later who said she usually started with a children's' book to see if she wanted to learn more on a topic! Makes sense in a way - condensed, easy to read, information that can interest you quickly. I was thinking, though, ...

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"Awful" Presidential Books (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


I enjoy the blog "Awful Library Books." This actually isn't about books being awful or anything, but rather how libraries need to weed because books do eventually become obsolete and given we don't have unlimited storage space, we have to change books as we buy newer, more useful books. I can go on for days (I have a library science degree....), but suffice it say, weeding is GOOD. So the books (well most of them!) weren't "awful" when purchased, but now, years later, don't belong on a public library shelf anymore (they might belong somewhere else, like an archive, ...

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Presidential Assassinations and Assassination Attempts (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

Over the years, four presidents have died from assassination while another six presidential assassinations have been attempted. The first assassination attempt occurred on January 30, 1835 when Richard Lawrence tried to shoot Andrew Jackson. Ironically, both of his guns misfired. He was found not guilty of the crime by reason of assassination. Read about this and the other presidential assassinations and assassination attempts.

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Revolutionary Con(tra)ceptions: Evangelicals, Family Matters, and Presidential Politics (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:


by Carol Faulkner

Forreaders of Religion in American History, Saturday’s online New York Times juxtaposes several interesting articles. The firstis a Room-for-Debate exchange on Newt Gingrich’s response to his ex-wife’s allegationthat he asked for an open marriage (“False!”), which received resoundingapproval from a South Carolina audience this week. The second is a column by Mark Oppenheimer on how evangelical voters celebrate the large families of theRepublican presidential candidates.  Thethird is an opinion piece on Gingrich’s marital revelations by Gail Collins.Collins and the other NYT writers all puzzle over the evangelical voters’tolerance of hypocrisy and contradiction. These articles also present a ...

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Presidential Assassinations and Assassination Attempts (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

Since the founding of the United States, four Presidents have been assassinated while in office. An additional six presidents were subject to assassination attempts. President Gerald Ford was actually subject to not just one but two assassination attempts, both by women. Learn more about each assassination and attempt on President of the United States.

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Presidential Slave Chefs (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


This article from NPR talks about black cooks in the White House. The main focus of this article is Hercules, the Washington's cook, and James Hemings, Jefferson's, but it also mentions others, like Lyndon Johnson's. I'm going to share the part on Hercules here, but you can find the rest at the link above:
Hercules, Washington's slave chef, may have been trained by Martha Washington. It was Martha who brought slaves into Washington's home when the two married. Martha was known for her table and for her "Great Cake" (40 eggs, four pounds of butter, four pounds of sugar, five ...

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A Century of Presidential First Pitches (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:





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Presidential Assassination Attempts (About American History)

An interesting history-related post from About American History:

Four U.S. Presidents died from assassination while in office and another six were subject to assassination attempts. Only one, Gerald Ford, was subject to not just one but two assassination...

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Presidential Assassination Attempts (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

Four U.S. Presidents died from assassination while in office and another six were subject to assassination attempts. Only one, Gerald Ford, was subject to not just one but two assassination ...

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Presidential Election Law (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


Found a nice site on Presidential Elections and the law. It is Jurist - Presidential Election Law. It provides statutes, cases, news and information about the laws regarding political broadcasting, campaign finance, voter registration and presidential debates. Includes Florida Recount 2000 section.  The site notes that it, "presents this Guide as a non-partisan educational resource for voters, citizens, and observers of the US electoral process."

Although it hasn't been updated since 200, it still has lots of good information.

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Presidential Teeth (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


Dentists were on my mind today (not because of anything fun I assure you), so I looked up the dental history of the presidents.
This picture of Woodrow Wilson shows his bad teeth. According to the site, this could have contributed to his stroke.

Washington's false teeth are well documented, but Adams refused them:
When Adams lost his teeth, he refused to wear false ones. As a result, he had a lisp when speaking. In later years Adams had trouble speaking. After encountering a fellow senior citizen in 1811, Adams wrote: "He is above 80. I cannot speak, and he ...

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