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Posts Tagged ‘poussin’

“Of Outstanding Aesthetic Importance and Significance for the Study of Poussin’s Art.” (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

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This phrase occurs in a press statement from the Dept of Culture, Ministry and Sport about a temporary export ban on Poussin’s Young Moses Treading on Pharaoh's Crown which is owned by the Duke of Bedford.

“The painting by Nicolas Poussin depicting the moment the infant Moses trampled Pharaoh’s crown, will be exported overseas unless a matching offer of £14,000,000 is made. The Culture Minister issued the temporary export bar in the hope that a UK buyer can be found in the time allowed.

Ed Vaizey took the decision following a recommendation by the Reviewing Committee on the Export of ...

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Article on Poussin’s Holy Family in New Mexico Mercury (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

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Not from me, for a change. Last week I was sent an article by Bill Peterson. The end of the article will tell you all about Bill, but I’ll say that he has worked at the Getty and admires Poussin’s Holy Family with 11 Figures which is shared between that museum and the Norton Simon. It’s a long article but worth reading. This took me back to my doctorate as I wrote a lot on the Holy Family, the Flight into Egypt and similar subjects. And I fully agree with Bill that St Joseph in this- and a number of ...

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The Connoisseurship Paradox (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

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Book Review.

Anna Tummers, The Eye of the Connoisseur: Authenticating Paintings by Rembrandt and his Contemporaries, , University of Amsterdam, 2011, published in the U.S.A. by J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 2011, 349 pages.

A Significant Deattribution.

For many members of the general public, the ways of curators and museum professionals remain as inscrutable as the workings of the divine. As Anna Tummers confides in her introduction, many paintings are attributed and de-attributed out of the public eye. And it was such a clandestine demotion at the National Gallery Washington during 2004-5 that sowed the seeds that became ...

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The Elephant in the Room (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

I only recently caught up with Christie’s attempt to sell Poussin’s Hannibal Crossing the Alps on a Elephant in July. I’ve been neglecting the art market of late, so I didn’t hear about the auction until this month. My first thought was that it was a shame to separate the Hannibal from its two other Poussins at the Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University.

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When I told another Poussin scholar about this, he expressed reservations about how the valuations of paintings are disconnected from scholarship, which to him is the elephant in the room, the thing nobody seems to want to ...

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Poussin and “The Shock of the Nude.” (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

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Well, for better or worse there’s no doubt that modern artists like Poussin. This time it’s the turn of the late pop artist Richard Hamilton. His last major artwork was interrupted by death last year; but as the Independent reports here, “he allowed the National Gallery to incorporate three of his Photoshop studies in a show of his works he was already planning with them.”

The image above was inspired by Balzac’s famous story about an artist, Le Chef-d’œuvre inconnu I have used this source on my courses, but I usually choose Picasso's witty drawings and paintings on the ...

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What do Poussin and the London Underground have in common? (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

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Nicolas Poussin, Triumph of David, Dulwich Picture Gallery. Clive Head, Terminus Place, Dulwich Picture Gallery.
If you go along to this  forthcoming talk at Dulwich Picture Gallery, you might find out. 

In Conversation: Nicolas Poussin and Clive Head

Tuesday 4 December

7 for 7. 30pm/Linbury Room

Join Xavier Bray, this time in conversation with artist Clive Head and critic Michael Paraskos as they discuss Clive Head’s project From Victoria to Arcadia at Dulwich Picture Gallery and Marlborough Fine Art.  Painted in response to Nicolas Poussin’s The Triumph of David, Clive Head’s work ‘Terminus Place’ will sit temporarily alongside the gallery’s ...

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A View from the Albertina (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

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So last Saturday lunchtime I was sitting on a park bench in the centre of Vienna, admiring a neo-classical fountain adorned with a Triton making advances to a startled water nymph. The plashing of water and the chirping of the birds provided a natural foil to the drone of urban traffic audible in the distance. Soothed by all this, I reflected on my earlier visit to the Albertina, one of Vienna’s famous museums.

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The word “Albertina” has never conjured up Prince Albert to me, whose residence it used to be, but drawings- sheets and sheets by the score, of the ...

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Poussin Connoisseurship Project resumes (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

Mystic Marriage1

Very sorry for slow posting on the PCP. but it was a case of OBE, (overtaken by events) which made demands on my time.

We resume with a post about a painting in Edinburgh, the Mystic Marriage of St Catherine. Is it a Poussin or not? Read here to see what I think.

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Some Modest Self Promotion (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

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This month sees the publication of a book of 15 essays on the theme of self and space in the early modern. There’s a chapter on Poussin’s Self- Portraits by me, as well as a lot of stimulating essays by scholars from not only art history but other disciplines.

My copy is winging its way to me as I write, but Google Books have got excerpts from the book on-line here.

The fruits of a series of conferences on the theme, run by UCLA between 2007-8, a lot of work has gone into this book- and I’m proud to ...

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PCP continues… (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

calf fragment
 
An enigmatic two-headed fragment that did the rounds as a Poussin, until the attribution hit a slight snag.  Details here.

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PCP. Next Entry: Northampton copy of Golden Calf. (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

So we move to Northamptonshire from Leicestershire, to consider a copy of Poussin’s troubled masterpiece in London- The Adoration of the Golden Calf.

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Poussin Leicester Holy Family (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

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The next entry on the Poussin Catalogue Project is up. This time I’m considering whether a Holy Family in the Leicester Art Gallery was painted by the master.

 

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A Poussin Recovered and a “Poussin” Discredited. (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

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The genuine article.
I don’t usually post twice on the same day- but it was great to hear via Bendor about the recovery of the stolen Poussin Midas.

Meanwhile, that other “Poussin” Baptism, along with the other recovered “old masters” is the subject of  a short article in the Art Newspaper, “Experts have doubts about the “Poussin” and other old masters seized in Rome.” Sorry, it’s not on their website. I only heard via a press release sent to Warwick University. Sorry again- but I don’t know how to get the text off the PDF.

Both Bendor and I ...

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More on Poussin (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

Just in case you don’t read comments I’m putting up a great response to the Red Sea post by a fellow Poussin scholar, Stephen Conrad. Amongst Stephen’s insights are mention of the “reconstruction of the pillar of cloud” to the right of the picture,  far more significant than the changed figure I commented on yesterday. And amen to the possible reunification of the London Adoration of the Golden Calf and the Red Sea, which would be the culmination of this meticulous restoration. How I long for that day!

“As a fellow Poussinist I have enjoyed reading your blogs, and ...

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Restoration and Reversal (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

Perhaps this belongs on the PCP site- news of the completion of the restoration of Poussin’s Crossing of the Red Sea, a painting in National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne.

This report from ABC news reproduces two photos of a section of the painting: one section before cleaning; another after restoration. You’ll see the back of the head of a young man, which according to the curators in this report was Poussin’s correction to a face he originally painted but didn’t like. They base this observation on the study of related visual sources such as engravings and replicas. ...

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Poussin Connoisseurship Project (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

NP SP det

" As long as our school follows in your footsteps, it will be esteemed in spite of its faults; when it ceases to appreciate you, art will fall into decline.”

As Bendor said yesterday, I’ve started another blog devoted to Poussin matters alone: mainly connoisseurship issues, inspired by GAP, PCF and others.

You can access it here, or via the link on the sidebar.

The aims of the project are briefly explained over there, as well as the format I’ll be using; the first entry on the Birmingham copy after Poussin’s Christ and the Blind will be up ...

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A Puzzling Picture in the Rijksmuseum. (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

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Cardinal Borromeo distributing Charity in a Landscape with Ruins, attributed to Henry Ferguson, or Hendrick Vergazon, dated, 1700-1720, oil on canvas, 130 cm x 193 cm,
Some paintings are real conundrums, like this one that turned up in a Facebook discussion between me and some other art lovers last week. A colleague in Amsterdam, Maaike Dirkx, unearthed this intriguing, not to say baffling picture from the depths of the Rijksmuseum. I’ll let Maaike describe it:

“This painting poses all sorts of intriguing questions. It shows the saint Carlo Borromeo standing in an idealised classicist landscape next to an enormous marble ...

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Some Problems in Poussin Connoisseurship via the Google Art Project. (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

GAP Poussin
Poussin gallery at GAP

Although I’m sure that this wasn’t in the minds of the people behind the Google Art Project (GAP),it may turn out to be quite a useful tool for connoisseurs. For one thing it makes a lot of obscure pictures visible, some of which I have never encountered as a Poussin scholar; so GAP throws up opportunities for considering, and in some cases re-considering some connoisseurial  problems in Poussin. It also highlights some of the problems in using reproductions to judge colour and style, a huge topic which I can’t do justice to here. Maybe another post ...

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37 Masters? (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

Following up on the report of the Rome heist recovery, here’s a article from that fount of art history knowledge- the Telegraph.

The paintings include Portrait of a Knight by Van Dyck, Christ on the Cross by Rubens and The Baptism of Christ by Nicolas Poussin, a 17th century French artist who spent most of his working life in Rome.

Lesser known works include an exquisite painting of the Madonna and Child by the 13th century artist Berlinghiero Berlinghieri, who came from Lucca in Tuscany, and a work by a student of Caravaggio.

Two of the masterpieces may have been ...

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Poussin recovered, but is it a Poussin? (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

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Att. to Poussin, here rejected, perhaps unknown 17th century Italianate artist, Baptism of Christ, detail, Italian police hand-out!

I’m hearing of the rescue of many stolen old masters by the Italian police, the famous carabinieri military police. See the Guardian article here. It records the finding of 37 works of art taken in an art theft in Rome in 1971. Artists mentioned are Van Dyck (Portrait of a Cavalier), Guido Reni and Poussin (Baptism of Christ). I can’t comment on van Dyck and Reni, but I know that this isn’t by the French master. The ...

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Claude in Oxford (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

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Claude Lorrain. Ascanius and the Shooting of the Stag, 1682, Ashmoleon Museum, Oxford
Decided to visit the Claude Lorrain exhibition in Oxford yesterday. I wasn’t disappointed: an excellent appraisal of Claude that takes in his paintings, drawings and etchings. Jon Whitley and the other curators have set every thing out nicely; you get three rooms devoted to the three types of media.

I spent about 90 minutes in it, most which was mainly looking at the room of Claude’s drawings. It’s fascinating to trace his use of wash, and eventually black chalk. It’s very instructive, especially the wall devoted to ...

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Poussin’s Revenge (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

The above is what  a colleague of mine is calling the wave of  impending strikes at the National Gallery. In response to concerns about security, the foot soldiers of the museum are threatening a series of strikes next month that could seriously disrupt the high-profile Leonardo exhibition due to start on the 9th November.  The cause of these projected walkouts are the new security arrangements. From the Guardian:

“Under pressure from government cuts, the gallery has instructed its warders – now called "gallery assistants" – to each watch over two rooms rather than one, as previously. Warders claim ...

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Normal Service will be resumed as soon as possible (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

keep-calm My apologies for the long gap of time since the last post. I didn’t intend to stay away from the blog that long, but circumstances intervened: problems with my computer, issues with Typepad, and a whole load of non-art history stuff over the last six weeks which put blogging well and truly out of the picture. I’ll tell you about it sometime. I’ll be  resuming blogging soon, probably with a review of a new book on connoisseurship, both traditional and scientific, sent to me recently. There’ll also be posts on Leonardo- I’m teaching a course on him- and possibly more ...

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Naturalized Antiquity and Classical Graffiti at Dulwich (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

poussin12 On the face of it what could Poussin (his Rinaldo and Armida pictured here) and the American abstract artist Cy Twombly possibly have in common? I didn’t go to this exhibition, but I’ve seen a few reviews, some favourable, some damning. Reading Brian Sewell’s caustic review of the show currently on at Dulwich, I can see that the minds behind this exhibition are seeking parallels between Poussin’s approach to mythology and Twombly, who is noted for labelling his works after myths like Leda and the Swan and Hercules and Patroclus. Yet, Sewell is surely right to observe that Twombly’s ...

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