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Posts Tagged ‘news’

Looking at the Category of New Religious Movements (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

John L. Crow

As the year 2013 comes to a close, I am already thinking about the New Year, and the next semester. In a week I’ll begin teaching a New Religious Movements class. This winter break has given me the time to think about the subdomain of New Religious Movements, and I must admit that after creating a syllabus and looking at the topic from a variety of viewpoints, I am ambivalent about the sub-discipline.

In his 2007 essay, “New New Religions: Revisiting a Concept,” J. Gordon Melton asked again, “What are we studying?” After looking at the changing ...

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Looking at the Category of New Religious Movements (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

John L. Crow

As the year 2013 comes to a close, I am already thinking about the New Year, and the next semester. In a week I’ll begin teaching a New Religious Movements class. This winter break has given me the time to think about the subdomain of New Religious Movements, and I must admit that after creating a syllabus and looking at the topic from a variety of viewpoints, I am ambivalent about the sub-discipline.

In his 2007 essay, “New New Religions: Revisiting a Concept,” J. Gordon Melton asked again, “What are we studying?” After looking at the changing ...

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National Museum of the US Navy to host Battle of Lake Erie Commemoration (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

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Join us at 9:00 am on Tuesday, 10 Sept. 2013 at the National Museum of the United States Navy for a day of activities including exhibit tours, demonstrations, first person interpretation, period music, and a lecture at noon.

Schedule of events:

9:05 Showing of WGTE’s documentary “The War of 1812 in the Old Northwest” in the MEC

10:00-10:30 Tour of ”1813 Don’t Give Up The Ship” exhibit with Curator Dr. Edward M. Furgol

10:30-11:00 Welcoming Mix and Mingle with Mrs. Madison who will be meandering around the museum ...

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Ashley Bowen and the News of Bunker’s Hill (Boston 1775)

An interesting history-related post from Boston 1775:

On 16 June 1775, mariner Ashley Bowen (1728-1813) of Marblehead wrote in his diary: “General [Israel] Putnam is a-trenching on Bunker’s Hill at Charlestown.”

Bowen seems to have known everything that happened in his home town, and on that evening he even apparently knew about the provincial army’s big move down the coast. Yet that action surprised the British commanders in Boston the next morning.

Here’s what Bowen recorded on 17 June:
This day the Merlin [a Royal Navy ship patrolling Marblehead harbor] firing on a target. This morning the King’s troops set fire to Charlestown and came ...

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The Slow Spread of Official News about Bunker Hill (Boston 1775)

An interesting history-related post from Boston 1775:

In response to this week’s question about George Washington on 17 June 1775, the day of the Battle of Bunker Hill, a few people guessed he was in New York on the way to the siege lines. In fact, he didn’t leave Philadelphia until the morning of 23 June, a full week after he agreed to be commander-in-chief. His letters make clear that even he didn’t expect his departure to take that long.

Washington reached New York on 25 June, and there opened a dispatch from Boston with a report on the fighting in Massachusetts. (Adding to the ...

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Operation Praying Mantis, 18 April 1988 (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

On 14 April 1988, watchstanders aboard USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) sighted three mines floating approximately half of a mile from the ship. Twenty minutes after the first sighting, as Samuel B. Roberts was backing clear of the minefield, she struck a submerged mine. The explosive device tore a 21-foot hole in the hull, causing extensive fires and flooding. Ten Sailors were injured in the attack. Only the heroic efforts of the ship’s crew, working feverishly for seven straight hours, saved the vessel from sinking. Four days later, forces of the Joint Task Force Middle East (JTFME) executed the ...

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First Nuclear-Powered Aircraft Carrier Launched at Newport News, Virginia – 24 September 1960 (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

Enterprise Launching

The Big “E”

By Captain Vincent P. de Poix, U. S. Navy, published in the June 1962 issue of Proceedings magazine:

From an operational standpoint, the ability of Enterprise to accelerate and decelerate merits first mention. In both cases our capability exceeds any conventional aircraft carrier. This capability is of tremendous benefit when carrying out our primary function of air operations in that we can turn into the wind at a later time with assurance that we can produce the requisite 35 knots of wind over the deck for launching or recovering aircraft.
During periods of light wind ...

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NHHC Underwater Archaeology Branch and MDSU2 Survey SB2C Helldiver Wreck (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

The Naval History and Heritage Command’s Underwater Archaeology Branch (UAB) is currently cooperating with the U.S. Navy’s Military Sealift Command (MSC) and U.S. Navy Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit TWO (MDSU-2) to investigate a WWII-era SB2C Helldiver aircraft wreck off the coast of Jupiter, FL. The objectives of the investigation are to identify the aircraft [...]

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Underwater Archaeology and STEM Programming (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

The U.S. is currently prioritizing their public education agenda to focus on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) subjects. The Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) and its Underwater Archaeology Branch (UAB) have created a pilot program to highlight aspects of the underwater archaeology field in order to complement STEM initiatives. The purpose of this [...]

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U.S. News Gets Around to the American Revolution (Boston 1775)

An interesting history-related post from Boston 1775:

A few months back, I chatted by phone with Michael Morella, Associate Editor at U.S. News & World Report, about the Boston Massacre. That magazine’s editors had decided to assemble a special issue devoted to the American Revolution.

That timely magazine hit the market this month, and it looks like a solid introduction to the topic built from recent books and interviews with recognized experts. The articles are grouped under four themes:
  • Turning Points
  • Diplomacy & Discord
  • In the Trenches 
  • Myths & Legends
As a grab-bag of basic information and intriguing facts, the magazine reminds me of a ...

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H.L. Hunley Fully Visible for the First Time (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

On February 17, 1864, Confederate-built H.L. Hunley became the world’s first successful combat submarine when it attacked and sank the 1240-short ton screw sloop USS Housatonic at the entrance  to the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina. H.L. Hunley surfaced briefly to signal a successful mission to comrades on shore with a blue magnesium light, after which it was never seen [...]

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Hey Look! We made the news! (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

Inforum did a follow-up article on the vicissitudes of Orlando Ferguson’s Square and Stationary Earth map and our supersweet comments thread gets a mention as the place where Jeff and Jeannie, each owners of a copy of Ferguson’s map bringing the known total up to four, first found out about each other.

One map owner is Jeff Speaect of Pierre, S.D. In the mid-to-late 1990s, Speaect, a stamp collector, found the map.

Speaect grew up in Oral, S.D., just outside of Hot Springs where the map published by Orlando Ferguson in 1893 originated.

“I found (the map) in an ...

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Black Hills and Sioux land compensation still in the news (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

A Rapid City S.D. newspaper reports that on this year’s anniversary of “Victory Day,” as Lakota people call the defeat of Lt. Col. George Custer, the Sicangu Lakota Treaty Council was meeting at Fort Laramie National Historic Site with the aim to determine what might yet be retrieved from the old promises about the Black Hills.

Two treaties were negotiated at Fort Laramie between the U.S. government and Plains Indian tribes. The treaty of 1851 attempted to secure safe passage for non-Indian migrants on the Oregon and California trails and settle traditional territorial claims of the tribes.

The treaty of ...

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Wilkes Exploring Expedition (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

May, 14 1836 A U.S. Exploring Expedition was authorized to conduct exploration of Pacific Ocean and South Seas. This was the first major scientific expedition overseas by the United States. LT Charles Wilkes USN, led the expedition in surveying South America, Antarctica, Far East, and North Pacific. The following article is taken from Proceedings Oct [...]

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NavyTV – Lights, Camera – ACTION (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

Now Hear This – the GI Film Festival is coming to the Navy Memorial next week! The GI Film Festival, the nation’s first and only military film festival, is coming to the Navy Memorial May 9-15, 2011. We have a week full of celebrity red carpet events, dazzling parties and inspirational films by and about [...]

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USS Chester Escorts Survivors of Titanic Disaster (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

April, 14th 1912 RMS Titanic struck an iceberg and sank at 2:20 in the morning, resulting in the deaths of 1,517 people. USS Chester was ordered to escort the RMS Carpathia into New York following the Carpathia’s gathering up of survivors. The following article is from Proceedings #158 1915. Loss of the Titanic The Titanic [...]

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Contributors in the News (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

Paul Harvey

A brief note on some of the doings of our contributors here at RiAH.

First, John Fea is busy on a speaking schedule in support of his new book Was America Founded as a Christian Nation?On part of that tour he appeared at the Virginia Festival for the Book, and his panel there is now up on the C-SPAN website (it was shown on C-SPAN 2, that harvest of riches for book geeks everywhere).

Contributor Jon Pahl has been traveling the world, engaging in interfaith dialogues, currently in Jakarta. You can follow his travels ...

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Pearl Harbor in the News… (History Matters: Musings of Jared Frederick)

An interesting history-related post from History Matters: Musings of Jared Frederick:


In the attempt to find something different to share to commemorate the 69th anniversary of Pearl Harbor, I dug through some archives to discover a December 8, 1941 issue of the New York Times. (I wanted to share this on the actual anniversary, but my internet connection is so poor at my college apartment I can't upload photos there.) Obviously, the vast majority of articles are in regard to the attack on U.S. Naval bases, the invasion of additional Pacific Islands, and the expectation of Franklin Roosevelt to declare war that day. Japan's conquering of Guam, the Philippines, and ...

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