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Posts Tagged ‘national’

10 Wealthiest Presidents (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:

I found this list of the 10 wealthiest US presidents. Most are not surprising (Washington was the wealthiest), but I will admit one surprised me:
4. Andrew Jackson
> Net worth: $119 million
> In office: 1829 to 1837
> 7th president
While he was considered to be in touch with the average middle-class American, Jackson quietly became one of the wealthiest presidents of the 1800s. “Old Hickory” married into wealth and made money in the military. His homestead, The Hermitage, included 1,050 acres of prime real estate. Over the course of his life, he owned as many as 300 ...

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National Maritime Day: Remembering The Forgotten (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

Memorial Day is traditionally a time to honor those who have not only served our nation, but who through their service made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. Sailors, Soldiers, Marines, Airmen, and Coast Guardsmen bear arms and go in harm’s way because they are the warriors of our great nation. Each year in May, we remember and honor these warrior heroes. 

But there is another important group of men and women who do not wear the uniforms of our armed forces – yet still willingly go in harm’s way for our country, and they have done so since our ...

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Little Rock, Arkansas and the National Guard (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

On September 24, 1957, President Dwight D. Eisenhower took control of the National Guard in order to force the state of Arkansas to allow nine African-Americans (the Little Rock Nine) to attend the 'all-white' Little Rock Central High School.  Early in September, 1957, Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus had the state's National Guard prevent any of the Little Rock Nine from entering the school. His use of the National Guard in this fashion was soon struck down by a federal judge. When on September 23, 1957, the students were finally allowed to attend the school, a mob outside threatened violence. Eisenhower ...

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Republican National Conventions (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

Since the Republican National Convention is occurring right now in Tampa, I thought it might be interesting to take a look at the first Republican convention.

The first Republican National Convention was held in Philadelphia in 1856. John C. Fremont was chosen as the candidate. His nickname was "The Trailblazer" due to fame gained for crossing the Rockies numerous times and helping to get California from Mexico. Since the convention occurred during the buildup to secession...

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Yosemite National Park (American History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American History Blog:


Deep in the Sierra Nevada, California’s snow-capped mountains, is a special hidden treasure – not gold or silver, but America’s most spectacular hidden valley.

It is called Yosemite and it is the center of one of our most popular national parks.

Yosemite Valley is seven miles long and in some places less than half a mile wide.  Towering on both sides of the winding Merced River are sheer granite walls more than 2,000 feet high.  Ribbon-like waterfalls cascade down the sides.   To the north, Half Dome Mountain presents its flat, scarred face.   (The other half of Half Dome cracked off ...

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WWII art from UK National Archives on Wikimedia (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

"It's up to You (Britannia)" by Tom PurvisMore than 350 original World War II artworks from the National Archives collection have been scanned and uploaded to Wikimedia. Wikimedia UK gave the National Archives a grant to take high resolution pictures of part of their 2000-piece collection of art created for Ministry of Information propaganda during the Second World War. The long-term goal is to scan the entire collection, but they’re starting off with 350 posters, drawings, oil paintings, portraits, and caricatures by well-known artists and talented artists who should be well-known, including famous images and slogans.

"Keep mum - she's not so dumb" by unknown artistThe National Archives is hoping the new visibility of their ...

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Boston National Historical Park’s New Location (Boston 1775)

An interesting history-related post from Boston 1775:

This is a big week for Boston National Historical Park. Today the park is scheduled to close its visitor center at 15 State Street, across the cobblestones from the Old State House, and by the end of the week its new visitor center will open in Faneuil Hall.

Here’s how Faneuil Hall looked in the late 1700s (courtesy of Boston College).

In 1806 the architect Charles Bulfinch oversaw its expansion to its current dimensions. That produced more space for town meetings on the second floor, and more space for merchants on the ground level—where the ...

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Amazing new Titanic pics in National Geographic (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

The April issue of National Geographic is marking the centennial month of the sinking of the Titanic with exceptional new pictures of the wreck composed from thousands of side-scan, sonar and high definition images taken by the 2010 expedition.

“This is a game-changer,” says National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) archaeologist James Delgado, the expedition’s chief scientist. “In the past, trying to understand Titanic was like trying to understand Manhattan at midnight in a rainstorm—with a flashlight. Now we have a site that can be understood and measured, with definite things to tell us. In years to come this ...

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National Archives Titanic Exhibit (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

If you've read our article on the Titanic and want more information, Britain's National Archives have launched an online exhibition. It has crew and passenger lists, stories about some of those on board, podcasts and more.

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A First for the Louvre and an Omission in the National Gallery. (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

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Georges de La Tour, Christ in the Carpenter’s Shop, 1645, oil on canvas, 137 x 101 cm.

 

Reading Art History News and the Tribune de l'Art posts about the Louvre's acquisition of a painter, hitherto unrepresented in that museum, Jean Le Clerc, got me thinking about a glaring 17th century French omission in our own National Gallery. This is a painter who may have influenced Le Clerc, Georges de La Tour. Though the gallery has a good collection of the French school, Poussin, Claude, Mignard, Le Sueur, the Le Nain, Champaigne, Vouet, it doesn’t posses a La Tour, though ...

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National Guard Presidents (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


I found this series that highlights presidents who served as national guardsmen. I had actually been looking up John Tyler's service:
Like his father, John Tyler strongly supported America's role in the war of 1812. As a young legislator in the Virginia House of Delegates, Tyler voted for every anti-British measure proposed during the 1812 session. In the summer of 1813, word reached Tyler that a British raiding party had plundered Hampton, Virginia, and appeared ready to march up the James River to Richmond. He immediately joined the Charles City Rifles, a local militia company formed to defend ...

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Medicine Wheel/Medicine Mountain National Historic Landmark (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

In August, a ceremony was held to celebrate the creation of the Medicine Wheel/Medicine Mountain National Historic Landmark in the Bighorn National Forest in Wyoming.

Up to now, the Medicine Wheel National Historic Landmark had been designated as a landmark only for its archeological value and encompassed a 110 acre area around the Medicine Wheel. But the new NHL (National Historic Landmark,) recognizes the Bighorn Medicine Wheel and Medicine Mountain as a nationally significant site because of its traditional cultural value to many tribes, and includes more than 4,000 acres.

The article announcing this action claims this is the first ...

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National Park Service rule would allow tribes gathering rights in national parks (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

It is reported that the National Park Service has proposed a new rule that would allow American Indian tribes to remove plants and minerals from national parks for traditional uses.

The document, dated March 25, was stamped “confidential.” It states that NPS intends to authorize agreements with federally recognized Indian tribes to allow plants or minerals to be used for traditional purposes. The agreements would allow the continuation of cultural traditions on ancestral lands that are now part of the NPS estate. The rule would also provide opportunities for tribal youth, the agency and the public to learn about tribal ...

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National Congress of American Indians ACTION ALERT (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

The National Congress of American Indians, a lobbying and organizational group for American Indian tribes, has issued an alert about a major threat to tribal sovereignty.

I will only quote a little of the alert here. To contact NCAI for more information: John Dossett, General Counsel jdossett@ncai.org NCAI Contact Information: Derrick Beetso, Legal Fellow dbeetso@ncai.org

To learn more go to the alliance of tribal sovereigns web site.

NCAI says:

“Tobacco Manufacturers and States Target Tribal Tobacco Revenues Through Master Settlement Agreement.

We urge all Indian tribes to begin immediate outreach to their State Attorney General and Governor to ask that ...

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Native Alaska corporation wants land in Tongass National Forest (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

The Anchorage Daily News reports that the Sealaska land deal will be heard in Congress this week.

The newspaper states in part: “For decades, conservationists, the U.S. Forest Service, tribes, Native corporations and the people who live in the Tongass National Forest have warred over how to manage the vast temperate rain forest covering most of Southeast Alaska.

The fight resurfaces in Washington this week, as the Sealaska Native Corp. makes a case to a Senate committee that it should be able to pick as much as 85,000 acres outside of its original land grants in the forest.

The company’s ...

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National Gallery occupied 9/12/10 (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

Fountain_in_Trafalgar_Square_2

 

 

 

Nearly every museum and art school seems to be in occupation these days.  

This time it's the National Gallery's turn.  

Nwp01
 

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Secret sealed room found in India’s National Library (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

Restorers working on the 18th century Belvedere House in Kolkata, home to the National Library of India, have found a large hidden room they had no idea was there. By found I mean they discovered that it existed, not that they’ve actually gone inside because there is no visible means of entrance or egress.

The house has suffered from neglect over the decades. Last year, all 2.2 million books were moved out of the old building into a new structure on the 30-acre estate so that the Belvedere House could be thoroughly restored.

The ministry of culture that owns ...

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National Museum of American Jewish History (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

Randall Stephens

David O'Reilly has an interesting piece on the opening exhibit at the National Museum of American Jewish History: "Chronicling Lives More than Religion," Philadelphia Inquirer, November 14, 2010. (The new museum is open to the public on Nov 28.) O'Reilly interviews deputy curator Josh Perelman and describes some of the highlights ranging from the 17th to the 20th century.

. . . After entering on Market Street, visitors are invited to start their tour on the fourth floor, in the year 1654, and descend through time, floor by floor, to the present, inspecting more than a thousand ...

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1969 — Black Panther National Anthem by Elaine Brown

Yes – He turned and be walked
Past the eyes of my life.
And, he nodded and sang without sound.
And his face had the look
Of a man who knew strife
And a feeling familiarly came around.

REFRAIN:
I said,
Man, where have you been for all these years
Man, where were you when I sought you
Man, do you know me as I know you
Man, am I coming through

And, he spoke in a voice
That was centuries old.
And, be smiled in a way that was strange.
And, his full lips of night
Spoke about our people’s plight
And a feeling familiarly came around.

REFRAIN

And, we sat and we talked
About freedom and things.
And, he told me about what he dreamed.
But I knew of that dream
Long before he had spoke
And a feeling familiarly came around.

REFRAIN

National History Day Needs Your Help (USHistoryBlog.com)

An interesting history-related post from USHistoryBlog.com:

This message is from the National History Day Organization - it's an organization that works with teachers and students in creating projects to present in a variety of formats to a panel of judges. Each year there is a theme where students choose and manage their own projects. It's a good organization. It's losing some funding - and this email below is a call to action to try and keep some of that money coming in to help continue the great things this organization does.

Please read below....


"To our supporters:

We are now at a critical juncture in our ...

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