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Posts Tagged ‘map’

Incredible Blitz map, or, how is there still a London? (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

The UK’s National Archives has compiled an astonishing interactive map detailing the locations and dates of all the bombs that fell on London and environs during the Blitz. The Bomb Sight project has taken the original bomb census maps which documented the Blitz as it happened between October 7th, 1940, and June 6th, 1941, and uploaded the data onto web map. The bomb census maps used to only be available to visitors who went in person to the Reading Room of The National Archive, so this is an incredible resource now at the public’s fingertips for the first time.

You ...

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First complete map of Titanic wreck site (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

In the summer of 2010, experts from RMS Titanic Inc., the company that has legal custody of the wreck of the Titanic, and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution returned to the famous wreck site off the coast of Newfoundland armed with the latest and greatest submarine imaging technology. The aim of the expedition was to map the entire 15 square mile debris field using high definition 3D and 2D photography and high resolution sonar.

The wreck site had been surveyed before, but none of the previous efforts combined covered more than 60% of the total area. Mappers were ...

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Leventhal Map Center Finding Its Way to New Location (Boston 1775)

An interesting history-related post from Boston 1775:

On 22 October, the Leventhal Map Center will reopen to the public in the older McKim wing of the Boston Public Library.

The photo above, from the Boston Globe, shows executive director Janet Spitz in front of a feature of that new space: a map of Boston in 1775 enlarged on glass by the Lynn Hovey Studio. The original is credited to Lt. Richard Williams of His Majesty’s 23rd Regiment of Foot.

In the meantime, check out the center’s Flickr collection as well as its online catalogue.

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Coin find widens Roman Map (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

Find a Roman coin in England doesn't sound unusual, or even finding nearly a hundred, as a pair of metal detectorists recently did. But there are areas of England with little evidence of Roman expansion, and so this find of these coins from forty miles west of Exeter aroused interest. As the detectorists registered their finds with the Portable Antiquities Scheme, the University of Exeter were able to investigate, excavate, and found interesting remains, including a road, settlement, burials and evidence for international trade. The PAS website has a quote from the woman leading the research, and details of a ...

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A Map of Washington (Boston 1775)

An interesting history-related post from Boston 1775:

Smithsonian magazine offers an online look at some of George Washington’s map collection, drawn from Barnet Schecter’s new coffee-table book, George Washington’s America: A Biography Through His Maps.

As a surveyor, large property-owner, speculator in western lands, military commander, and government leader, Washington was keenly aware of the value of maps. His own collection ended up in the Yale University library system (much as, I suppose, two of Benjamin Franklin’s maps came to the Boston Public Library).

The image at top is a detail from one of those maps, a London rendition of the siege ...

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Map of WW2 UK Prison Camps (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

During World War 2 Britain housed around 400,000 prisoners of war across its country. Now the Guardian is using a new book on the subject - Sophie Jackson's 'Churchill's Unexpected Guests' - as a reason to put online a map featuring every known camp. It's using Google, is zoomable and I discovered that there was a 'German Work Camp' a five minute drive up the road from me. If there are any British locations with meaning to you, worth a look.

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