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Posts Tagged ‘library’

The Digital Public Library of America opens today (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

At noon today, the Digital Public Library of America opened for business. Modeled on the greatness that is the Europeana library, the DPLA collects more than two million objects from museums, historical archives, universities and libraries across the country. The focus is American cultural history as reflected in photographs, manuscripts, letters, maps, artifacts, books, audio, films and more, all drawn from contributing institutions like the Smithsonian, the National Archives, the New York Public Library, Harvard University, the David Rumsey Historical Map Collection and the University of Virginia. The DPLA conveniently collates material already online — things you could find if ...

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Color of Christ comes to the Newberry Library and to Chicagolandia (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

Paul Harvey

Home For you Chicagolanders who enjoy getting out on balmy January evenings in your city, with the gentle tropical winds 
from the lake caressing your parkas, below is information about a free public lecture based on material from The Color of Christ at the Newberry Library two weeks from tomorrow (Tuesday, Jan. 22, at 6 p.m.). Thanks to blog contributor and digital humanist extraordinaire Chris Cantwell for organizing this event. Ed and I will also be giving presentations that same week at the University of Chicago, UIC, Valparaiso University, Northwestern, and hopefully at some blues dives or on some ...

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Rave review of Reservation “Capitalism” from American Library Assoc. (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

My new book, Reservation "Capitalism:" Economic Development in Indian Country (Praeger Publishers, 2012), received a great review in the August issue of the magazine Choice. Choice is the book review journal of the American Library Association and recommends to libraries which books to buy. 

I have been given permission to reprint the review here:
 

49-7006

E98

2012-403 CIP

Social & Behavioral Sciences \ Economics

Miller, Robert J.  Reservation "capitalism": economic development in Indian country.  Praeger, 2012.  208p bibl index afp; ISBN 9781440801112, $48.00; ISBN 9781440801129 e-book, contact publisher for price. Reviewed in 2012aug CHOICE.

...

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Religious Pluralism in America: Announcement of NEH Program at Newberry Library for Community College Teachers (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:


We made this announcement a while back, but with the full program of this NEH program at the Newberry Library now filled in, I'm going to repost. Chris Cantwell, a good friend of the blog at Assistant Director at the William Scholl Center at the Newberry, is one of the co-directors of the program. You all who teach or administrate at community colleges, please circulate this among your lists and your faculty. 

Out of Many: Religious Pluralism in America: An NEH Bridging Cultures in Community Colleges Program

Meeting of the World's Parliament of Religions, 1893 World's Fair. Barrows, John Henry, ...

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Library Staff Find Stash of Ancient Coins (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

I love stories like this: a custodian called Tanja Hols was working at the Passau Historic State Library in Germany when she found a wooden box which had been left for many years. When she opened it, she found a collection of 172 gold and silver coins, many dating back to the ancient Greek, Roman and Byzantine eras. The coins' value is easily in six figures, and staff believe the box was deposited in the library c. 1803, in order to avoid handing church assets over to the state. The personal side of this story is that Hols is going ...

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British Library puts 4 Million Pages of Old Newspaper Online (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

I've mentioned the British Library's plans to digitise its entire collection of newspapers before, so I'm pleased to report that four million pages of print has now gone online. Searching is free, viewing a page will cost a little, but the material is from eighteenth and nineteenth century papers which includes local material such as the Manchester Evening News.

...

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More About Washington’s Library Books (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:



Back in April, 2010 Michael picked up on a story making the rounds in several news outlets regarding the fact George Washington had two books that were over 220 years late he had borrowed from the New York Society Library.    

Michael’s post stated, “The library says they aren’t interested in pursuing the fine (that would be pretty hard!), but would like to find the original books.”

So, were the original books found tucked away on some book shelf at Mount Vernon? 
 
Did The Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association have to cough up the hefty fine of $300,000 which ...

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Schecter on Washington’s Maps at Boston Public Library, 6 Dec. (Boston 1775)

An interesting history-related post from Boston 1775:

On Tuesday, 6 December, the Boston Public Library will host a talk by Barnet Schecter about his book George Washington’s America: A Biography Through His Maps.

This book is based on a collection of maps that Washington owned which were eventually bound in a single volume, now at Yale University. It traces the first President’s life through those maps, some of which he drew as a surveyor and landowner, most of which he collected as a land speculator, military leader, and political official.

The book is oversized and heavily illustrated, letting readers see the maps as Washington did. ...

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British Library hit 500 Manuscripts Online (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

Since September 2010, the British Library has been digitising manuscripts and placing the results online. They have now uploaded their five hundredth item, and this blog post has a sample ...

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‘Stolen’ Manuscript Found: in Library (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

In the 1920s, the Elisha Palmer collection was donated to Connecticut College. This contained four medieval manuscripts which went missing in the 1950s, and they were presumed stolen. However, when Ben Panciera was looking through storage boxes recently he found one of them (still inside the library). It's a Dominican work in Latin and French and written on vellum, dates to before 1600, and its ownership can (once again) be traced back a monastery in Rouen, France. It's still believed the other three were stolen, but you never know...

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Danger Listing includes Library and Bus Station (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

The World Monuments Fund have recently published their biennial report, listing sixty seven of the most at risk heritage sites from across the world. Britain had seven sites newly listed, and they range from the traditional to the modern. One example of the traditional is the ruined Cistercian Abbey at Quarr, which was founded in 1132 on the Isle of Wight, and which is now in need of repair.

...

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Clinton Library (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


Happy Birthday to President Clinton! This is one I always remember because it is also mine (I'm younger than President Clinton in case you were wondering...). C-SPAN is a special on presidential libraries and you can watch them online. So I figured I'd highlight the Clinton Library today.

You can check out this handwritten draft of Clinton's statement on the Oklahoma City bombing.

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Dr. Nassir Ghaemi at Boston Public Library Tonight (Boston 1775)

An interesting history-related post from Boston 1775:

I’m going outside the eighteenth century to mention that Dr. Nassir Ghaemi will speak at the Boston Public Library this evening at 6:00 P.M. about his new book, A First-Rate Madness.

Two years back, when I was at the Organization of American Historians meeting in Seattle, I attended a session where Dr. Ghaemi spoke. His topic was the intersection of modern psychiatry and history—specifically, the case of Gen. William T. Sherman of the Union Army, and his history of depression.

As I noted a year later, Dr. Ghaemi had a broader argument: that bipolar/manic-depressive disorder and schizophrenia are ...

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British Library buys email archive (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

There isn't too much unusual in the news that the British Library has purchased a poet's archive, but what's interesting about their acquisition of Wendy Cope's is that it includes 40,000 emails, their largest purchase of electronic material so far. If you're as interested as I am in how we're going to record e exchanges for future historians, give this article a look...

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All-night scavenger hunt at the NY Public Library! (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

This is so cool that calling it so cool doesn’t do it justice. Just when you think “okay, it couldn’t possibly get any cooler than this,” it gets even cooler.

On May 20, 2011, five hundred pre-registered people will get to spend the whole night in the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building of the New York Public Library, the newly restored 1911 Beaux Arts masterpiece that was supposed to be the glamorous venue for Carrie Bradshaw’s aborted wedding to Mr. Big and is the main branch of the NYPL system. From dusk until dawn (8 PM to 6 AM), players will ...

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New York Public Library facade restored to gleaming (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

The New York Public Library turns 100 years old this year, and now that a three year, $50 million dollar restoration is complete, it can celebrate in gleaming high style.

NYPL facade before (above) and after (below)

The Stephen A. Schwarzman Building was completed in 1911, and was instantly lauded as a Beaux Arts masterpiece and an emblem of American populism. What would have been a fit abode for royalty in Europe in the United States was a library, a public palace open to all. New York City is hard on marble, though, and over the years the facade began to deteriorate, more so than people ...

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Navy-Themed Sheet Music of the WWI Era (1914-1919) (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

Navy-Themed Sheet Music of the WWI Era (1914-1919) as drawn from Bernard S. Parker’s World War I Sheet Music. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, 2007. 2 vols. The purpose of this list is to provide basic information on Navy-themed sheet music of the WWI period (1914-1919) as drawn from Parker’s work. The term “Navy-themed” refers to [...]

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Some new titles at the Navy Department Library (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

Come visit us at the Washington Navy Yard to check out these and many more books! Allah’s angels : Chechen women in war / by Paul J. Murphy An Army at the crossroads / by Andrew F. Krepinevich Attitudes aren’t free : thinking deeply about diversity in the US armed forces / [edited by] James [...]

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The Library of Dream (Beachcombing's Bizarre History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Beachcombing's Bizarre History Blog:

Beachcombing has, on previous occasions, enumerated some of his preferred invisible libraries: books or collections of books that never existed save in the imagination of fantasizing authors. And he could hardly overlook a notable recent contribution to the genre, the Library of Dreams by Neil Gaiman.

For those who don’t know NG is an author of graphic novels and novels. Among his many works he has written a series built around the figure of Dream, a being (‘god’ doesn’t really do him justice) who controls the imagination (dreams, fantasies etc) of the universe.

Now in Dream’s realm there is a library and in this library ...

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Mail Call: Navy Department Library (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

We like getting donations in the mail at the Navy Department Library.  Gifts like items from the original commissioning of the Battleship Missouri enhance our collections and support the research of US Navy personnel, historians, scholars, and other researchers.  Interested in enhancing our collection of materials?  Click here.

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Secret sealed room found in India’s National Library (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

Restorers working on the 18th century Belvedere House in Kolkata, home to the National Library of India, have found a large hidden room they had no idea was there. By found I mean they discovered that it existed, not that they’ve actually gone inside because there is no visible means of entrance or egress.

The house has suffered from neglect over the decades. Last year, all 2.2 million books were moved out of the old building into a new structure on the 30-acre estate so that the Belvedere House could be thoroughly restored.

The ministry of culture that owns ...

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George W Bush Library Ground-breaking (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


Ground was broke for the George W Bush Library on Tuesday. The library is scheduled to be open in February of 2013 and will be at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. Some facts about the new library:
  • The Bush Center will sit on a 23-acre lot on the campus of SMU in Dallas, Texas, and include the George W. Bush Library, which includes the archives and museum, and the George W. Bush Institute.
  • The design includes a 15-acre urban park featuring native landscaping and includes a rainwater collection system that will provide 50 percent of the irrigation needed.
  • The ...

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Do You Owe The Library Any Late Fees? (American Revolution & Founding Era)

An interesting history-related post from American Revolution & Founding Era:

I don't know about you, but I love to read books. I'm frequently seen at our local Borders and at our local library. In fact, I'm known to walk out of our local library with a huge stack of books, ready to explode out of my grip and all over the floor!

And...yes...I've helped the local government by paying my fair share of late fees over the years. Fortunately, my home county of Loudoun doesn't charge late fees. They just freeze your card. :-(

But the neighboring county of Fairfax DOES charge late fees, and come to think of it, ...

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Introduction (European History Fail Blog)

An interesting history-related post from European History Fail Blog:

Welcome to European History Fail Blog. As a group of pretentious, snobby high school students, we hope this project that we'll probably end up abandoning after a week or two can bring you some joy. This blog is a play on Fail Blog, but every Fail is a historic Fail in European History. It is also a far-fetched attempt at getting an extra credit point or two. Please excuse the crappy photoshop jobs, corny jokes, and generally awkward feeling emanating from every post.

Enjoy.

Sincerely,

Leo and Jason

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