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Posts Tagged ‘korea’

U.S. Navy recipients of the Medal of Honor: Korean War (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

Posted by Michael Ford

Tomorrow, the Secretary of Defense, Chuck Hagel, dedicates a Korean War display in the Pentagon. In honor of those who served and gave their life protecting freedom, today we remember the Navy Medal of Honor recipients for actions during the Korean conflict: Hospital Corpsman Third Class Edward C. Benfold; Hospital Corpsman Third Class William R. Charette; Hospital Corpsman Richard David De Wert; Hospital Corpsman Francis C. Hammond; Lieutenant (j.g.) Thomas Jerome Hudner, Jr.; Hospital Corpsman John E. Kilmer; and Lieutenant (j.g.) John Kelvin Koelsch. (For more information on naval history during the Korean War see http://www.history.navy.mil/special%20Highlights/Korea/index.htm ...

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Naval Reserves in the Korean War (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

Three Panther jets make a pass over their carrier USS Boxer (CV-21) before landing aboard in Korean waters.

On July 27, 1953, the Korean War Armistice Agreement was signed at Panmunjon, Korea, and the Korean cease-fire went into effect at 10:00 PM, ending three years of combat. The following article, published in the July 1952 issue of Proceedings, gives an account of what it was like to be a part of a Naval reserve group in the Korean war.

STANDBY SQUADRON

By LIEUTENANT W. H. VERNOR, JR., U. S. Naval Reserve

 

IF you’ve ever driven between the Texas cities ...

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The Wonsan Operation, 20 October 1950 (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

The great success of the Inchon Invasion in September 1950 led General Douglas A. MacArthur to order a second amphibious assault, targeting Wonsan on North Korea’s east coast. After landing there, Tenth Corps could advance inland, link up with the Eighth Army moving north from Seoul, and hasten the destruction of the North Korean army. [...]

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President Harry S Truman authorizes support for the Republic of Korea (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

In the early morning of 25 June 1950 local time, North Korean forces attacked across the 38th Parallel.  Equipped with Soviet-made tanks, supported by massed artillery fire, the communist offensive quickly drove south through Koesong and toward Uijongbu north of Seoul.  Other attacks pressed against the mainly South Korean defenders all across the frontier to [...]

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Beginning of the Korean Conflict (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

On June 25, 1950, the Korean conflict began when North Korea invaded South Korea.  Five days later, the United States joined the conflict to assist South Korea.         In Spetember 1950, Proceedings reprinted a short article from the Navy Public Relations News Letter, titled “Why We are fighting in Korea”, which concisely listed the crucial events [...]

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Aerial Torpedoes in Korea 1 May 1951 (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

The Navy has long been known for its ability to adapt its striking forces quickly to handle the constantly varying circumstances of combat.  One such instance occurred on 1 May 1951, during the Korean War. In late April, the Communist Spring Offensive began with a thrust down the center of the Korean peninsula as part [...]

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Political Infighter: The Story of Admiral Thomas Hinman Moorer, USN (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

Thomas Moorer stands out as one of the few senior American military leaders who fought hard with the political establishment over the conduct of the Vietnam War. As Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from July 1970 to July 1970, Moorer constantly pushed for the authority to strike targets in the Hanoi area with [...]

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Frozen Chosin (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

“Chosin,” one of the winners of the 2010 GI Film Festival, documents the Battle of Chosin Reservoir and its survivors. In the winter of 1950, 15,000 U.S. troops were surrounded and trapped by 120,000 Chinese solders in the frozen mountains of North Korea. Refusing surrender, the men fought 78 miles to freedom while saving the [...]

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Eisenhower: I will go to Korea (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


So I spent a week on Vietnam, I'm on to Korea now.:) I'm going backwards, I guess!

I found this article on Eisenhower's campaign and the issue of Korea:
"The biggest fact about the Korean war is this: it was never inevitable, it was never inescapable. No fantastic fiat of history decreed that little South Korea—in the summer of 1950—would fatally tempt Communist aggressors as their easiest victim. No demonic destiny decreed that America had to be bled this way in order to keep South Korea free and to keep freedom itself self-respecting.

"We are not mute prisoners of history. ...

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