AP History Notes

The world's best AP history notes
Posts Tagged ‘iii’

Richard III Dig Site Yields Interesting Coffin (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

Do you remember the car park where archaeologists, against all odds, found the bones of Richard III of England? Well digging is still going on, and now the team have found an interesting burial. There are two layers, one a stone casket two metres long, with a lead coffin inside. Both are intact.

...

Read Full Post

Read the original post.

How they Remade Richard III’s Face (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

If you've been following the news on the discovery of the bones of Richard III of England, you might have seen the lifelike reconstruction of his face. If you have, you'll probably find this BBC article interesting, as they take a 'who, what, why' approach to how it was (re)created.

Read the original post.

Richard III Found (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

It was an archaeological longshot but it captured the public imagination: could a dig in a Leicester car park find the lost body of Richard III, England's most unpopular king? Killed at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485, Richard's body would theoretically contain the marks  of certain wounds and deformities, and when the archaeologists found a skeleton which seemed to fit the world took notice. Now a careful study on every aspect of the bones, including DNA tests on descendants of Richard's relatives (Anne of York...

Read Full Post

Read the original post.

Book Review of Edward III and the War at Sea: The English Navy, 1327-1377 (Military History)

An interesting history-related post from Military History:

Reblogged from International History:

Click to visit the original post

Graham Cushway. Edward III and the War at Sea: The English Navy, 1327-1377. Warfare in History series. Woodbridge, England: Boydell Press, 2011. ISBN 978-1-84383-621-6. Notes. Illustrations. Maps. Appendices. Bibliography. Index. Pp. xxii, 265. $99.00.

The English navy played a key role in the Hundred Years War.  Dr Graham Cushway, a maritime historian and Associate Analyst for the United Nations, explores the English navy and the war at sea from the accession of Edward II (ruled 1307-1327) to the death of  Edward III (1327-1377). 

Read more… 1,168 more words

Read the original post.

England’s Richard III Found? (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

A few weeks ago I reported on the dig taking place in Leicester to find the Greyfriars Friary and, at the more wishful end of the search, the body of one of England's most unpopular kings: Richard III (it's a tie between him and John). Well, the University of Leicester have just announced they found a skeleton which "appears to have suffered significant peri-mortem trauma to the skull which appears consistent with an injury received in battle." Indeed "a barbed metal arrowhead was found between vertebrae of the skeleton's upper back" and the skull was smashed. The next step is ...

Read the original post.

England’s Richard III Found? (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

A few weeks ago I reported on the dig taking place in Leicester to find the Greyfriars Friary and, at the more wishful end of the search, the body of one of England's most unpopular kings: Richard III (it's a tie between him and John). Well, the University of Leicester have just announced they found a skeleton which "appears to have suffered significant peri-mortem trauma to the skull which appears consistent with an injury received in battle." Indeed "a barbed metal arrowhead was found between vertebrae of the skeleton's upper back" and the skull was smashed. The next step is ...

Read the original post.

Archaeologists look for Richard III (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

This story is really about archaeologists looking for the lost Franciscan Friary in Leicester called Greyfairs, but the minor Richard III aspect has stolen the headlines so I'll play along. Basically, after Richard III - a King of England so unpopular there's never been a Richard IV - was killed in 1485 his body ended up being buried at Greyfriars.

...

Read Full Post

Read the original post.

Locavangelism: Eating as Spiritual Practice, Part III (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

Editorial note: This is Part III of Rachel Wheeler's discussion of what she calls "locavangelism." Part I is here; Part II is here. The last couple of paragraphs here are a repeat from Part I, which I repeat here as a summary of the series.

by Rachel Wheeler

Why now?

Having attempted to show how various wings of the modern food-centered environmentalist movement draw on patterns of evangelicalism, I’d like to take a stab at answering two questions: why food now? and what does it all mean? The immediate answer to the first question, I believe is 9/11 and the ...

Read the original post.

Fourth “Great Escape” tunnel found under Stalag Luft III (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

Archaeologists excavating Stalag Luft III, the Luftwaffe POW camp in Lower Silesia made famous by Steve McQueen in The Great Escape, have found a fourth tunnel dug after the failure of the attempt immortalized/fictionalized on film. Although historians knew about the existence of this fourth tunnel, named George, and that it was dug underneath the camp theater, its exact location was a mystery.

Using ground-penetrating radar and information from POWs who survived internment, archaeologists spent three weeks looking for George. Now they’ve found it and it still contains a number of artifacts left behind when the Germans hastily evacuated ...

Read the original post.

The Gospel of the Working Class: Gellman/Roll Interview, Part III (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

By Heath Carter

The final installment of my interview with Erik Gellman and Jarod Roll: _________________________

HC: What factors best explain why some were attracted to this radical gospel and others were not? Are there underlying unities within the diverse spectrum of persons that populate your narrative?

EG: Embracing this radical gospel was not the easy path. It meant risking your livelihood and defying the dominant cultural norms of Jim Crow, not to mention class and gender assumptions about who had the right to lead and wield power in America. Many people who embraced this gospel did so during ...

Read the original post.

1775 — Proclamation of Rebellion by King George III

August 23, 1775

GEORGE R.

Whereas many of our subjects in divers parts of our Colonies and Plantations in North America, misled by dangerous and ill designing men, and forgetting the allegiance which they owe to the power that has protected and supported them; after various disorderly acts committed in disturbance of the publick peace, to the obstruction of lawful commerce, and to the oppression of our loyal subjects carrying on the same; have at length proceeded to open and avowed rebellion, by arraying themselves in a hostile manner, to withstand the execution of the law, and traitorously preparing, ordering and levying war against us: And whereas, there is reason to apprehend that such rebellion hath been much promoted and encouraged by the traitorous correspondence, counsels and comfort of divers wicked and desperate persons within this realm: To the end therefore, that none of our subjects may neglect or violate their duty through ignorance thereof, or through any doubt of the protection which the law will afford to their loyalty and zeal, we have thought fit, by and with the advice of our Privy Council, to issue our Royal Proclamation, hereby declaring, that not only all our Officers, civil and military, are obliged to exert their utmost endeavours to suppress such rebellion, and to bring the traitors to justice, but that all our subjects of this Realm, and the dominions thereunto belonging, are bound by law to be aiding and assisting in the suppression of such rebellion, and to disclose and make known all traitorous conspiracies and attempts against us our crown and dignity; and we do accordingly strictly charge and command all our Officers, as well civil as military, and all others our obedient and loyal subjects, to use their utmost endeavours to withstand and suppress such rebellion, and to disclose and make known all treasons and traitorous conspiracies which they shall know to be against us, our crown and dignity; and for that purpose, that they transmit to one of our principal Secretaries of State, or other proper officer, due and full information of all persons who shall be found carrying on correspondence with, or in any manner or degree aiding or abetting the persons now in open arms and rebellion against our Government, within any of our Colonies and Plantations in North America, in order to bring to condign punishment the authors, perpetrators, and abetters of such traitorous designs.

Given at our Court at St. James’s the twenty-third day of August, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, in the fifteenth year of our reign.

GOD save the KING.