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Posts Tagged ‘historical’

American Society of Church HIstory Annual Winter Meeting 2014 (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Michael Pasquier

The winter meeting of the American Society of Church History is fast approaching. Here's a list of panels that should be of interest to those who visit the blog. The range of topics is incredible. I wouldn't miss it for the world. You can get the full program here.

Thursday, January 2

The Christian Law of Marriage: Debate and Discussion of A.G. Roeber's Hopes for Better Spouses: Protestant Marriage and Church Renewal in Early Modern Europe, India, and North America
Heike Liebau
Amanda Porterfield
Kirsten Sword
A. Gregg Roeber

Printing Evangelicalisms: Evangelical Book Culture across Three Centuries
...

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Mantegna drawings (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

For those interested in renaissance drawings, I hear through the dealer network about a couple of Mantegna drawings due to be auctioned in Italy next month. I’m particularly intrigued by his study for an Lamentation; this has the body of Christ reversed on the lower portion of the sheet.

A M  008

Marco Fagioli of Farsettiarte writes, “the Lamentation of Christ is an extraordinary piece for compositional invention and drawing strength. In the upper part Mantegna composed the scene foreshortening Christ body according to the vanishing point perspective, a variation from the central perspective of the Lamentation over the Dead Christ of Brera ...

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Historical Society of the Episcopal Annual Meeting (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Michael Utzinger

I had the pleasure of attending the annual meeting of the Historical Society of the Episcopal Church (HSEC) in San Antonio, Texas on 10-11 June 2013 in San Antonio, Texas.

The Rev. Will Wauters delivered the keynote address to the Society. A graduate of Stanford University and Church Divinity School of the Pacific, Wauters has served churches in East Los Angeles, San Francisco, Jersey City and Trenton in New Jersey and currently serves at Santa Fe Episcopal Church in San Antonio. For seven years he was Chaplain and taught Religion and Ethics at the Lawrenceville School in New ...

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Historical Research Publishes Free Austerity Issue Online (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

If you fancy reading some academic articles, Historical Research has published a special 'Virtual Austerity' Issue. Austerity is the watchword for the current British government as they make major changes ...

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Europe’s ’14 Most Endangered Historical Sites’ (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

Europa Nostra, a group the Huffington Post described as 'dedicated to the preservation of European landmarks', has published a list of the fourteen historical sites in Europe they believe to be most in danger of disappearing. The aim of the list is to launch a "call to action" over the locations, and soon they'll produce a shortlist of seven which will receive the supports of heritage experts. The Huffington post has pictures and descriptions.

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Historical Books Reveal ‘Fossil’ Record (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

In modern Europe the common furniture beetle and the Mediterranean furniture Beetle overlap in terms of their locations, but this didn't used to be the case. In previous centuries the beetles kept to very distinct and separate regions... and the reason we know this is because of woodcut books. In the 1400s Europe started using woodcuts - carved wooden blocks - to produce images in a form of early (for Europe) printing.

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Boston National Historical Park’s New Location (Boston 1775)

An interesting history-related post from Boston 1775:

This is a big week for Boston National Historical Park. Today the park is scheduled to close its visitor center at 15 State Street, across the cobblestones from the Old State House, and by the end of the week its new visitor center will open in Faneuil Hall.

Here’s how Faneuil Hall looked in the late 1700s (courtesy of Boston College).

In 1806 the architect Charles Bulfinch oversaw its expansion to its current dimensions. That produced more space for town meetings on the second floor, and more space for merchants on the ground level—where the ...

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Collector pleads guilty to stealing thousands of historical documents (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

Barry Landau leaving court after copping a plea, February 7, 2012Media relations professional, self-educated presidential historian, collector of inauguration memorabilia, pathological liar and thief Barry Landau pleaded guilty in federal court Tuesday to stealing thousands of historical documents from museums including (but not limited to) the Maryland Historical Society, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Connecticut Historical Society, the University of Vermont, the New York Historical Society, and the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library.

Jason SavedoffAccording to the plea agreement (pdf), Landau and his Canadian accomplice Jason Savedoff researched their targets online and off, compiling lists of the most valuable documents in the collections. From December 2010 until July 2011, ...

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A historical milestone of one’s own (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

The History Blog passed a million total pageviews today. Not just in one day, of course; I mean cumulative views since I first installed the counter in mid-September of 2009. That’s not counting my personal viewings, so the milestone isn’t composed primarily of me clicking on my old stories a thousand times a day.

Thank you all for reading, whether ye be silent observers, students searching for help with their homework, people in the news Googling themselves, and of course, my wonderful regular commenters who so generously contribute your own wit, curiosity and understanding to improving every post. :notworthy:

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‘Terrorism: A Historical Context’ (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

History Today has tackled the tenth anniversary of the 2001 terrorist attacks in America by publishing an article called 'Terrorism: A Historical Context'. This gives a brief introduction to how the term terrorism has evolved, and how acts of terrorism have evolved, before linking to a number of really good articles about related acts of 'terror'. Now, as far as I can tell this is all free to access and not behind their paywall (I can read everything without having an account), and is wide ranging.

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Children’s Historical Story Contest (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

Do you know a schoolchild interested in both writing and the Roman world? (Or are you such a schoolchild?) Then they might be interested in this contest. It's open to all under eighteens from around the world (providing you can enter in English), and asks them / you to write a mystery story set in the Roman era. I saw the details on the blog of Caroline Lawrence, who writes 'history mystery' books for kids.

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Five Diorama Ideas: Possible Historical Diorama Projects for Students, Hobbyists, or History Buffs in General (American Revolution & Founding Era)

An interesting history-related post from American Revolution & Founding Era:

This is a slightly revised version of an article I wrote for Suite101 a couple years back. The diorama ideas cover American history in general, not simply the American Revolutionary period, but I thought my readers here might be interested nonetheless.

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Five Diorama Ideas: Possible Historical Diorama Projects for Students, Hobbyists, and History Buffs in General

American history is an exciting subject, especially for those able to put themselves into history. Those who dislike history have never captured the ability to immerse themselves in it, instead seeing the past as a frustrating array of names and dates. Getting past ...

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Call for Papers – Current Events in Historical Perspective (Blog Them Out of the Stone Age)

An interesting history-related post from Blog Them Out of the Stone Age:

Ohio State’s Harvey Goldberg Center for Teaching Excellence will be hosting joint sessions at the American Historical Association annual meeting in Chicago January 5-8 2012 on the topic “Current Events in Historical Perspective.” We seek submissions for session papers that analyze a particular current issue — political, cultural, economic or social — in a larger, [...]

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Massachusetts Historical Society Fellowships (Boston 1775)

An interesting history-related post from Boston 1775:

It’s the season to apply for Massachusetts Historical Society fellowships. (That’s society founder Jeremy Belknap looking on encouragingly.) They come in many flavors, such as:
In separate news, this summer I’ll be working with folks at the society and the Longfellow House-Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site ...

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Vote to put a historical car on display at Smithsonian (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

The Smithsonian has a large collection of historical transportation, but most of the 73 vehicles have never been on display. The America on the Move exhibit at the National Museum of American History only showcases 14 of them. The rest live under tarps in a storage warehouse miles away from the National Mall.

Now for the first time the Smithsonian is opening the warehouse to let the public vote for two of its cars to roar out of the darkness into the Mall light. Over the past week, Roger White, Associate Curator in the Division of Work and Industry at ...

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How Will WikiLeaks Impact the Historical Profession? (Blog 4 History: American & Civil War History)

An interesting history-related post from Blog 4 History: American & Civil War History:

There has been some discussion about WikiLeaks and whether is it a good or bad thing for historians? Does the top secret information help historians write a more accurate narrative or do the leaks ensure that future access will be even more difficult and ultimately hinder future historiography? Is it ultimately so harmful that it could never be useful? Is there a level where historians are not entitled to such sensitive data? All legitimate questions.

The Chicago Tribune spoke with several historians and authors about the leaks and about the comparisons some are making between WikiLeaks and the Pentagon Papers. ...

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