AP History Notes

Posts Tagged ‘grant’

Daily History Picture: Medical Procedure or Make Up?

Not sure what is going on here….

Top 10 Things to Know About John Adams

John Adams is a fascinating character. While only serving one term as president, he had a huge impact on the formation of the United States. The HBO miniseries on John Adams based on the book John Adams by David McCullough met with critical acclaim and is a great look at Adams and his contributions. He truly was a fascinating character and in many ways an underrated president. This top 10 list of things to know about John Adams gives an overview the the key items that you should know when studying the second president of the United States.

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General Grant in Love and War

This is a neat article on Grant and his wife, Julia.  The quotes from their courtships letters are a lot of fun!
As soon as he was away, Grant began writing love letters to Julia Dent. They portray a tender, sensitive and insecure young man, overly concerned that his fiancée did not share the intensity of his longing for her. She did not write as frequently as he did, causing him great despair, but when she did compose and send letters, Grant would read them over and over.

“My Dear Julia,” he wrote. “You can have but little idea of the influence you have over me Julia, even while so far away…and thus it is absent or present I am more or less governed by what I think is your will.”


One letter arrived in return with two dried flowers inside, but when Grant opened it the petals scattered in the wind. He searched the barren Mexican sands for even a single petal, but in vain. “Before I seal this I will pick a wild flower off of the Bank of the Rio Grande and send you,” he wrote. Later, from Matamoras, he wrote, “You say in your letter I must not grow tired of hearing you say how much you love me! Indeed dear Julia nothing you can say sounds sweeter…. When I lay down I think of Julia until I fall asleep hoping that before I wake I may see her in my dreams.”

Grant and Cocaine

This talks about Grant’s addiction to cocaine as a way to deal with the pain of throat cancer to get his autobiography written.  He, like many others of the time, was addicted through patented medicine of the time:
However at age 63, the two-term President wasn’t poking snot with a rolled up $50 bill. He ingested his blow via a “French wine tonic” called Vin Mariani. The coca leaf-spiked concoction fueled ol’ Lyss to finish what became an instant bestseller that was hailed by critics. Each day Grant went through multiple bottles, each containing six milligrams of cocaine per fluid ounce. He pretty much slept the rest of the time.

The New York Times reported multiple accounts of Grant’s doctor as his main supplier. On Easter Sunday 1885, the President’s throat “was gargled and dressed in cocaine.” On April 11, the Gray Lady noted the patient “has been ‘better’ at various times only in the sense that his decline has been stayed because of drugs.”

Given the amount that the man was ingesting, his physician likely wasn’t the only one providing the juice. Twain, whose publishing house was still in its first year, later admitted to aspirations of becoming a drug dealer. In his autobiography The Turning Point of My Life (1910), he shared ”a longing to ascend the Amazon. Also with a longing to open up a trade in coca with all the world.”

Ulysses S Grant

On April 27, 1822, Ulysses S Grant was born. He was destined to lead the Union forces during the US Civil War. After the war, he rode a wave of popularity to be elected as the eighteenth president of the United States. Unfortunately, his time in office was wracked by five presidential scandals. Sadly, after the presidency, he lost all his money and wrote his memoirs as a way to raise money for his wife before his death on July 23, 1885.

Medieval Doom Painting Saved by £40,000 Grant

St Nicholas’ Church in Stanningfield, is home to a medieval Doom painting. These were pieces of art painted on the walls of churches to enforce the message of the vicar, using vivid and creative visions of heaven and hell. Unfortunately the Stanningfield Doom has been damaged by water leaking in from the roof, but a campaign to repair it has now received £40,000 from English Heritage and the National Lottery. I was lucky enough to see a Doom painting myself, and they’re something of a rarity in England now after many were destroyed during the years of religious and political upheaval of the early modern period. Bury Free Press has a picture, but you can’t really see the Doom very well at all.

Puppeteers get Heritage Grant

In Britain a proportion of the profits from a National Lottery are given to heritage causes. Since being established in the 90s, the Lottery has helped a lot of heritage projects, and as I was reading this article on recent grants, I saw something I thought I’d share. Right at the bottom, there’s the fact that £240,000 has been given to PuppetLink, in order to help conserve and teach the “350-year-old story of Mr Punch and wider puppetry traditions.”

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Grant Opportunity for Community College Instructors: Religious Pluralism in America

Paul Harvey

Just saw this from Twitterstorian Chris Cantwell (@cdc29) on an NEH-funded program for community college instructors at the Newberry Library: “Out of Many: Religious Pluralism in America.” I’ll just reprint the full announcement below, or click the link above.
______________________________________________________________

Newberry Receives More Than $325,000 from NEH for Community College Program

Greene, Community College Teachers Tour Chicago's Pullman District in 2011
January 2012
The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has granted the Newberry $326,803 to help community college faculty improve their instruction on American religious pluralism. Utilizing the Newberry’s rich collections and expertise, “Out of Many: Religious Pluralism in America” is a two-year, multi-day seminar program that will bring together 20 community college faculty to explore American religious pluralism through discussions with scholars in the field, public programs, and collaborative research focused on curriculum development.
“This is one of what we hope will be many programs involving our area community colleges, which play an important and, sometimes, pivotal role in furthering knowledge and fostering future scholarship,” Spadafora said. “This latest program nicely rounds out our academic programming, which serves undergraduate and graduate students, continuing scholars, short- and long-term Fellows, high-school teachers, and—most recently—community college instructors. We continue to be deeply grateful for the support of the NEH, without which we could not hope to fulfill our mission.”
“Out of Many: Religious Pluralism in America” will provide community college faculty knowledge and resources with which to design new courses or modify existing curriculum to integrate key episodes from America’s past and present that relate to American religious pluralism.
“Courses in history, literature, art, film, and philosophy, as well as more general ‘Introduction to the Humanities’ courses, can all be strengthened conceptually by drawing upon religious pluralism either as a the unifying theme of a new course or as a unit within preexisting syllabi,” Newberry Vice President of Research and Academic Programs Daniel Greene said. “Integrating the study of religious pluralism into the humanities curriculum also holds potentially important social benefits as well. Students will not only learn about the American past by studying religious pluralism, they also will come to better understand the diverse world in which they live.”
The grant was given to the Newberry’s Dr. William M. Scholl Center for American History and Culture as part of the NEH’s overall Bridging Cultures initiative, which encourages projects that explore the ways in which cultures from around the globe, as well as the myriad subcultures within America’s borders, have influenced American society. Specifically, the Newberry program falls under the NEH’s Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges Grants, which advance the role of the humanities at community colleges through curriculum and faculty development projects.
The project will be directed by Greene and Christopher Cantwell, Assistant Director of the Scholl Center and religious historian who later this year will publish the paper “Beyond the Protestant Nation: Religion and the Narrative of American History” in the journal Fides et Historia. Greene, who last year was promoted from Director of the Scholl Center to his current position, was a curator and historian at the United States Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. His most recent book is The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism: The Menorah Association and American Diversity (Indiana University Press, 2011).
“The National Endowment for the Humanities supports projects that document and explore the human endeavor in its many forms,” said NEH Chairman Jim Leach. “Whether it is preserving a valuable historical collection, enabling the production of a film or exhibition, or providing support for scholarly exploration of important topics in the humanities, the grants awarded today ensure that the shared stories of our past are available to communities across the nation for generations to come.”
The Newberry later will launch an expanded, enduring website featuring the faculty-generated teaching resources that stem from the seminars, which can then be used by all community college instructors as an online guide to integrating American religious pluralism into multiple humanities disciplines.
Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov. 

Grant Opportunity for Community College Instructors: Religious Pluralism in America

Paul Harvey

Just saw this from Twitterstorian Chris Cantwell (@cdc29) on an NEH-funded program for community college instructors at the Newberry Library: “Out of Many: Religious Pluralism in America.” I’ll just reprint the full announcement below, or click the link above.
______________________________________________________________

Newberry Receives More Than $325,000 from NEH for Community College Program

Greene, Community College Teachers Tour Chicago's Pullman District in 2011
January 2012
The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has granted the Newberry $326,803 to help community college faculty improve their instruction on American religious pluralism. Utilizing the Newberry’s rich collections and expertise, “Out of Many: Religious Pluralism in America” is a two-year, multi-day seminar program that will bring together 20 community college faculty to explore American religious pluralism through discussions with scholars in the field, public programs, and collaborative research focused on curriculum development.
“This is one of what we hope will be many programs involving our area community colleges, which play an important and, sometimes, pivotal role in furthering knowledge and fostering future scholarship,” Spadafora said. “This latest program nicely rounds out our academic programming, which serves undergraduate and graduate students, continuing scholars, short- and long-term Fellows, high-school teachers, and—most recently—community college instructors. We continue to be deeply grateful for the support of the NEH, without which we could not hope to fulfill our mission.”
“Out of Many: Religious Pluralism in America” will provide community college faculty knowledge and resources with which to design new courses or modify existing curriculum to integrate key episodes from America’s past and present that relate to American religious pluralism.
“Courses in history, literature, art, film, and philosophy, as well as more general ‘Introduction to the Humanities’ courses, can all be strengthened conceptually by drawing upon religious pluralism either as a the unifying theme of a new course or as a unit within preexisting syllabi,” Newberry Vice President of Research and Academic Programs Daniel Greene said. “Integrating the study of religious pluralism into the humanities curriculum also holds potentially important social benefits as well. Students will not only learn about the American past by studying religious pluralism, they also will come to better understand the diverse world in which they live.”
The grant was given to the Newberry’s Dr. William M. Scholl Center for American History and Culture as part of the NEH’s overall Bridging Cultures initiative, which encourages projects that explore the ways in which cultures from around the globe, as well as the myriad subcultures within America’s borders, have influenced American society. Specifically, the Newberry program falls under the NEH’s Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges Grants, which advance the role of the humanities at community colleges through curriculum and faculty development projects.
The project will be directed by Greene and Christopher Cantwell, Assistant Director of the Scholl Center and religious historian who later this year will publish the paper “Beyond the Protestant Nation: Religion and the Narrative of American History” in the journal Fides et Historia. Greene, who last year was promoted from Director of the Scholl Center to his current position, was a curator and historian at the United States Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. His most recent book is The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism: The Menorah Association and American Diversity (Indiana University Press, 2011).
“The National Endowment for the Humanities supports projects that document and explore the human endeavor in its many forms,” said NEH Chairman Jim Leach. “Whether it is preserving a valuable historical collection, enabling the production of a film or exhibition, or providing support for scholarly exploration of important topics in the humanities, the grants awarded today ensure that the shared stories of our past are available to communities across the nation for generations to come.”
The Newberry later will launch an expanded, enduring website featuring the faculty-generated teaching resources that stem from the seminars, which can then be used by all community college instructors as an online guide to integrating American religious pluralism into multiple humanities disciplines.
Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov. 

Grant’s Inaugural Ball



This astounded me – it is the list for the food at Grant’s second inaugural ball!
10,000 fried oysters; 8,000 scalloped oysters; 8,000 pickled oysters; 63 boned turkeys; 75 roast turkeys; 150 roast capons stuffed with truffles; 15 saddles of mutton; 200 dozen quails; 300 tongues ornamented with jelly; 200 hams; 30 baked salmon; 100 roasted chickens; 400 partridges; 25 stuufed boar’s heads; 2,000 head-cheese sandwiches; 3,000 ham sandwiches; 3,000 beef-tongue sandwiches; 1,600 bunches celery; 30 barrels of salad; 350 boiled chickens; 6,000 boiled eggs; 2,000 pounds of lobster; 2,500 loaves of bread; 8,000 rolls and 1,000 pounds of butter.

Dessert items inclued 300 charlotte russes; 200 moulds of wine jelly; 200 moulds of blanc mange; 300 gallons of assorted ice-cream; 400 pounds of mixed cakes; 25 barrels of Malaga grapes; 400 pounds of mixed candies; 200 pounds of shelled almonds; 200 gallons coffee; 200 gallons of tea and 100 gallons of hot chocolate.

And this is just some of it!

American Experience: Lee and Grant



PBS just ran two American Experiences documentaries. First, one on Robert E. Lee and this week, one on Ulysses S. Grant. Both focus on the Civil War. So the one on Grant is about that time, not his presidency. When I was just on PBS, it looks like you can watch all of Lee’s online, but only a trailer on Grant. Grant’s probably is coming as PBS is pretty good about that. I actually watched both from my DVR. I actually think PBS is still showing it a couple times this week if you want to try to catch it.

Personally, I learned more from the Lee one, but that’s because I didn’t know as much about Lee. I thought both were well down and each was about a 1 1/2, so not absurdly long. Grant’s did discuss his drinking and the questions that surrounded his commands because of it.

I did have to laugh when the documentary was talking about how when Grant was made commander of the Union armies, it meant it was part of the political scene he hated, given he ends up President! It also talks about Grant dismissing presidential talk as ridiculous and not interesting to him as he wasn’t a politican.

Of course, then the question is does he end up President?
At the beginning of the Reconstruction era, Grant, as general of the armies, attempted to work with Johnson. However, he did not like the President’s policies, which he thought repudiated the war’s legacy. A dispute arose between the two in 1867 when Grant refused to back Johnson in his struggle with Congress. Thereafter, the general moved increasingly towards the Radical’s viewpoint. He came to believe that the federal government had to preserve the sacrifices of the war by protecting African Americans from racist Southern governments and preventing former Confederates from retaking power. The Radicals began to court Grant with the idea of running him for President. Grant claimed that he had little interest in the presidency, but popular demand for his candidacy was too strong.

At the Republican Party convention in 1868, Grant’s nomination, which he won on the first ballot, was a mere formality. Speaker of the House Schuyler Colfax of Indiana was designated his running mate. The Democrats named New York governor Horatio Seymour to oppose them.

As was the custom of the times, Grant did not campaign. But he was easily the most popular candidate, and his election was never seriously challenged. He won the Electoral College vote by a nearly 3:1 margin over Seymour. However, he won the popular vote by only 300,000, tallying far below that needed for a governing mandate.