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Posts Tagged ‘fundamentalism’

Religion and US Empire Part 2 (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Today's guest post comes from Sylvester A. Johnson. Professor Johnson and Professor Tracy Leavelle are leading the Religion and US Empire Seminar, which includes both a working group and an AAR Seminar. Johnson's first post discussed the role of Christian fundamentalism in promoting a populist, mainstream embrace of US empire. In this post, he explains the linkage and resonance between US government approaches to engaging Communism and the broader religious imaginary of Christian nationalism.

The Refashioning of Christian Nationalism
Sylvester A. Johnson

In mainstream US media and the public imaginary, the specter of Communism was a fundamental threat ...

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Thanks, Mom: Christian Approaches to Motherhood (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:



Today is Mother’s Day (or perhaps Mothers’ Day, but definitely not Mothers Day). So, first of all, thank you to my mother, grandmothers, and especially my wife for being such great moms. That is the point of the holiday after all—to show our moms gratitude for the sacrifice and love they shared with their children. It is such an important role in our society that Christian evangelicals and fundamentalists have often been outspoken in support of traditional mothers. Even in conservative churches, the models of motherhood continue to change ...

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Shepherds of the Empire: Mark Correll on German Fundamentalism (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:



Actually, Mark would say "fundamentalism" is a pretty misleading word to describe his subjects.  Mark Correll is Chair of the History, Politics, and Geography Department at Spring Arbor University, and my colleague (I'm known as Mark "the Lesser" around campus).  Correll's recent book is entitled Shepherds of the Empire: Germany's Conservative Protestant Leadership, 1888-1919 (Fortress, 2014).  It's received strong endorsements from the likes of David Bebbington, Gary Dorrien, and Mark Noll.  When not counseling Lord Vader on his serious anger issues, Correll's pastor-theologians were busy interrogating, erecting, and erasing boundaries between "believing" (conservative) and "critical" (liberal) church leaders, between the ...

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The Age of Evangelicalism: An Interview with Steven P. Miller (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:


The following is an interview with friend of the blog Steven P. Miller about his groundbreaking new book, The Age of Evangelicalism: America's Born-Again Years (Oxford, May 2014).  Miller is also author of the critically acclaimed Billy Graham and the Rise of the Republican South (Penn, 2009).  If you backmask this post, a surprising revelation will appear: The Philadelphia Eagles will win ...

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The Urban Pulpit: New York City and the Fate of Liberal Evangelicalism (Review) (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Paul Putz


Those of us interested in the study of American religion in the Progressive Era and early twentieth century have had some fantastic reading material in the past year. I've previously covered two examples in new books from David Burns and Priscilla Pope-Levison. Now I get to turn to Matthew Bowman's The Urban Pulpit: New York City and the Fate of Liberal Evangelicalism (Oxford, 2014), a book derived from a dissertation completed under Michael Kazin at Georgetown.

The subtitle seems to indicate that this book will be primarily about liberal evangelicals, and Bowman does indeed have much to say about ...

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Religion and Toys (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Mitzvah Kinder (Photo by Amudart)
Laura Arnold Leibman

Why is it that Christian Fundamentalists have had better kitsch than Charedi Jews?  Will this always be the case?  To answer this question, I turn to one segment of American kitsch industry, the religious toy.  Childhood in general and toys in particular can enhance our understanding of what is "American" about in American religion. In a recent post on gender, the family, and modern evangelicalism, Randall Stephens noted, "the story of Christianity in America has often centered on childhood as well as parenting and the family."  In this post I ...

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A Culture of Conspiracy: An Interview with Michael Barkun (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:


I had the pleasure of interviewing my colleague Michael Barkun, Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Syracuse University, about the new edition of A Culture of Conspiracy: Apocalyptic Visions in Contemporary America, first published by the University of California Press in 2003, and reissued this past summer. A scholar of millenarian and right-wing movements, Barkun is also the author of Crucible of the Millennium (Syracuse University Press, 1986), Religion and the Racist Right (University of North Carolina Press, 1997), and Chasing Phantoms: Reality, Imagination, and Homeland Security since 9/11 (University of North Carolina Press, 2011). For other discussions of ...

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A Culture of Conspiracy: An Interview with Michael Barkun (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:


I had the pleasure of interviewing my colleague Michael Barkun, Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Syracuse University, about the new edition of A Culture of Conspiracy: Apocalyptic Visions in Contemporary America, first published by the University of California Press in 2003, and reissued this past summer. A scholar of millenarian and right-wing movements, Barkun is also the author of Crucible of the Millennium (Syracuse University Press, 1986), Religion and the Racist Right (University of North Carolina Press, 1997), and Chasing Phantoms: Reality, Imagination, and Homeland Security since 9/11 (University of North Carolina Press, 2011). For other discussions of ...

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“Confused as a termite in a YO-YO”: Appleby Baptist and Religion in the South (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:



“Confused as a termite in a YO-YO”: Appleby Baptist and Religion in the South
By Charity R Carney


            The folks at Appleby Baptist hate a lot of things. Here’s just a sampling of the targets of the Independent Fundamentalist congregation: interracial marriage, Obama, cowboy churches, other Independent Baptists, the NIV, tattoos, Southern Baptists, Beth Moore, flashy clothing, John ...

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Four Questions with Peggy Bendroth (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Randall Stephens

The historian Peggy Bedroth is the executive director of the Congregational Library in Boston, MA. Since her first book appeared 20 years ago, she has shaped the field of American religious history in profound ways.  Her insightful work on gender, childhood and family, and the cultures of

fundamentalism is as familiar to the grad student as it is to the established professor.  Among other things Bendroth has explored the day to day lives of believers and helped us understand how men and women, young and old, came to terms with the tumultuous 20th century.

I first encountered her ...

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Embattled Majority: Part II of Jason Bivins On His Work Embattled Majority (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

Today is Part II of our two-part series featuring Jason Bivins' reflections about and on his ongoing work Embattled Majority. Read Part I here.
by Jason Bivins

On one level, Embattled Majority is a genealogy of the tropes of persecution and victimization among religious conservatives since the 1960s, as well as among their vocal detractors. The book tells the story of this discursive formation – locating its origins in judicial decisions, school desegregation, and grassroots campaigning – but also focuses on how new media, religio-political celebrity, and the emotional registers of affront and offense give it shape and prolonged ...

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Embattled Majority: Religion and Its Despisers in America (Or: The Long-Lurching Wreck of American Public Life) (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

I'm psyched to guest post this two-part series from Jason Bivins, well-known to many of you out there for his books and articles, including Fracture of a Good Order (2003) and Religion of Fear (2008), which I reviewed several years ago on the blog here.

The Fracture of Good Order: Christian Antiliberalism and the Challenge to American PoliticsJason is currently at work on  a couple of projects. One of them, Spirits Rejoice, is about jazz and religion, and we'll have much more about that exciting book down the road. The other project is the one we're featuring for the next couple of days, from a book project entitled Embattled Majority. The work ...

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Reviews from 30,000 Feet (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

Will Jerry Falwell Blame Tupac and Notorious B.I.G. for Hurricane Sandy?
Ed Blum

1979 was an annus mirabilis in American religious history. Working tirelessly along the east coast, three men responded to the racial, political, gender, technological, and cultural momentums of the past decades to create something that would transform the entire nation, if not the world. When they hit the airwaves, millions of Americans took notice. It began simply enough: “I said a hip hop the hippie the hippie / to the hip hip hop a ya don’t stop.” Fifteen minutes of rhymes followed and we’ve never been ...

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The Antichrist and the Making of American Antiliberalism (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

By Steven P. Miller

FDR, Hitler, Mussolini, Obama, Nicolae Carpathia . . . It’s hard to keep up with all of the possible Antichrists, past and present. We need someone to keep the record straight. More importantly for students of modern American history, we need someone to tease out the connections between eschatology and politics—specifically, between dispensationalism and antiliberalism. That’s where Matthew Sutton comes in. Readers of the New York Times op ed page and viewers of MSNBC know that Sutton is up to the task. His recent presentation at the American Historical Association provided another window into his eagerly ...

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Reappraising the Significance of Religion in the Modern U.S.: 2012 AHA Session (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

Paul Harvey

Some of you blog readers may be getting ready for the 2012 American Historical Association meeting in sunny Chicago Jan. 5-8 2012. Because the AHA meets in conjunction with the American Society of Church History and the Catholic Historical Association, there are really too many sessions on American religion to list usefully. So instead I'll feature a few sessions of interest that particularly catch my eye in the coming days here, and invite the rest of you to promote sessions of interest to you, either in the comments section or by sending me a guest post.

To ...

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Reviewing the Anointed (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

by Matt Sutton

Part I: Anointing the Anointed

Randall Stephens and Karl Giberson’s book The Anointed has officially been out for two weeks. As reviews begin to appear, it is clear that this is one of the most important—and controversial—books on religion in modern America to appear in some time.

Booklist summarized, “[Stephens and Giberson] rise triumphantly to the challenge of explaining the leaders and the culture of the religious Right without rancor or condescension.”

The ever present Kevin Schultz wrote a smart review for the Wilson Quarterly concluding, “One of the principal virtues of The Anointed is that it ...

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NY Times Editorial: The Evangelical Rejection of Reason (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:


Kelly Baker

While John Turner aptly describes "dominionists on the loose" and the media brouhaha over the threat of theocracy via Christian dominionism, our own Randall Stephens, writing with Karl W. Giberson, had a New York Times editorial aptly titled, "The Evangelical Rejection of Reason" published yesterday. Coming on the heels of their book, The Annointed Age: Evangelical Truth in a Secular Age (reviewed here by Chris Beneke), they argue convincingly about the war on science as "part of a politically monolithic red-state fundamentalism, textbook evidence of an unyielding ignorance on the part of the religious" as well as ...

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All the World in One Cartoon: Or, A Picture Contradicts a Thousand Words (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

Randall Stephens

On Wednesday Chris Beneke posted a review on this blog of The Anointed: Evangelical Truth in a Secular Age, a book I coauthored with Karl Giberson. I especially liked Beneke's response to a populist, misguided review that appeared on the Creationist Answers in Genesis site. (The reviewers whipped up readers by claiming that Giberson and I are snoots who look down our noses on salt-of-the earthers who don't have PhDs.) "Credentials aren't irrelevant," Beneke writes, "but they aren't the real issue here (see: Herberg, Will). Rather, it's the misuse or wholesale neglect of critical facts that ...

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Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing; or, Knowing Them by Their Fruits (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

Chris Beneke

You might have anticipated that Randall Stephens and Karl Giberson's new book, The Anointed, would cause a stir. Just two weeks after arriving on shelves, it already has. Yesterday, Ken Ham, co-founder of the Creation Museum in Petersburg, Kentucky and CEO/President of Answers in Genesis (AiG) USA suggested on his blog that the authors were like wolves intent on destroying God's flock. (by the way, there's another interesting passage on wolves in Mat 7:15)

Meanwhile, at the affiliated AiG blog, Georgia Purdom and Mark Looy observed flatly that: "[Stephens and Giberson] argued that when Bible-believing Christians ...

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Aimee and Apocalypticism; or The 3 Days of the Sutton (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

Paul Harvey

Send lawyers, guns, and money,
The s*** has hit the fan
(Warren Zevon)

Warhol had his 15 minutes (leading one wag recently to opine that in the future everyone would be anonymous for 15 minutes), The Condor had three days, but this week our friend and contributor Matt Sutton has had his three days -- with some more to come. Call it the 3 Days of the Sutton.

First there was the New York Times editorial in Monday's paper, which we blogged about here. Then there was the appearance on the Lawrence O'Donnell show (and the ...

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Why the AntiChrist Matters in Politics (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

by J. Michael Utzinger

Matthew Sutton's reflections on the antichrist and American politics can be found in today's New York Times under the title "Why the Antichrist matters in Politics." There is some great food for thought here including how dispensational premillennialism (Sutton wisely didn't use this term in an op-ed) feeds anti-government sentiment. He also suggests that a power vacuum among politically oriented evangelicals have allowed libertarians and Tea Party activists (like Bachmann, Perry, and Paul) to exploit evangelical energies without the type of religious leadership (previously seen in individuals like Billy Graham and Jerry Falwell) who ...

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Bland is Beautiful: In Defense of Religious Moderation (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

Paul Harvey

I'm pleased today to host a guest post from Professor William Egginton, who is Andrew Mellon Professor of the Humanities at The Johns Hopkins University, where he also chairs the Department of German and Romance Languages and Literature. Egginton's new book is In Defense of Religious Moderation: click on the link for a brief summary of the book's major thesis. Egginton's post may be read profitably in conjunction with David Hollinger's discussion of Robert Putnam's and David Campbell's massive sociological study American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us, posted today at Immanent Frame. Hollinger ...

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Declension, National Salvation, and Other Discontents (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

Kelly Baker

At the end of June, the Huffington Post’s Tim Suttle queried “Why are evangelicals losing influence?” This claim of decline emerged from a Pew Research Center survey of evangelical leaders globally, in which 82% claimed that evangelicals were losing influence over culture. The blame, of course, landed firmly on the “rising tide of secularism.” Suttle disagrees with the causation, and instead he notes, “If evangelical influence is nose-diving we have no one to blame but ourselves.” The jeremiad of declension remains alive, well, and likely weary, and it seems fly in the face of presence of evangelicals ...

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Shall the Historians Win, Part III: The Roots of Fundamentalism in an American Family (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:


Paul Harvey

To continue with our theme for the day, I'm pleased to recommend to you a fascinating book, part memoir, part historical analysis, part family history, part personal meditation: Andrew Himes's The Sword of the Lord: The Roots of Fundamentalism in An American Family (the facebook fan page of the book is here).

As mentioned in the last post, this book arose from Himes's own struggles with his own family legacy as the grandson of the legendary fundamentalist leader John R. Rice. Historians love Rice; he's an endless source of colorful quotations from his paper The ...

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