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Posts Tagged ‘conferences’

Religion in California: Conference April 24-25 (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Today's guest post comes from Blaine Hamilton of Rice University, who informs us about the upcoming Religion in California conference to be held at the Graduate Theological Union, a spectacular location sitting right above the campus of the University of California, Berkeley, and providing a panoramic view of the Bay Area. 

Later this month I am privileged to be participating in the Religion in California conference at the University of California-Berkeley.  This focused event was organized by our own Ed Blum, along with Lynne Gerber and Jason Sexton, and it has been graciously funded by the California American Studies Association, ...

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Why I Go to Academic Conferences (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

by Laura Arnold Leibman

It’s that time of the year when spring break looms like a sunbeam of hope, and calls for conference papers and panels start piling up in my in box.  It is also the time of the year when local and specialty conferences will soon be upon us. As the child of academics, one of my early memories is of “family vacations” spent in conference hotels and of learning not to fidget during presentations. Why do we go to academic conferences? What do we hope to gain? Sometimes colleagues tell me that they have given up on ...

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Call for Papers: ASCH 2015 New York City Meeting (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Randall Stephens

Following up on Heath's post below about the ASCH spring meeting in Oxford, I post here Margaret Bendroth's CFP for the 2015 winter meeting in NYC.  The deadline is fast approaching, March 16, so please consider proposing panels or individual papers. 

CALL FOR PAPERS

American Society of Church History Winter Meeting 2015

The annual Winter meeting of the American Society of Church History (ASCH) will be held Friday to Monday, January 2-5, 2015, in New York, NY, in conjunction with the 129th annual meeting of the American Historical Association (AHA). We invite ASCH members to submit paper and ...

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The Bible in American Life: CFP (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Call for Papers:  The Bible in American Life
Conference: 6-9 August 2014, Indianapolis, IN

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis welcomes individual paper proposals on the topic of the Bible in American Life. Focusing on how Americans past and present have used the Bible in their daily lives, the conference (6-9 August 2014 in Indianapolis) will be interdisciplinary in nature, with scholars from various perspectives offering analyses from historical, cultural, sociological, and theological approaches, among others.

Thanks to a generous grant from Lilly Endowment, the Center for the Study of Religion ...

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ASCH Heads to Oxford (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Heath Carter

The American Society of Church History will hold its spring meeting jointly this year with Britain's Ecclesiastical History Society.  Oxford University will host the conference, which is set for April 3rd-5th.

The Harcourt Hill campus of Oxford Brookes University, where most of the sessions will unfold
 The meeting's primary theme is "Migration and Mission in Christian History."  As the call for papers explains: "From the scattering of the Jerusalem Church in 70 CE through the 'barbarian' invasions of the Roman Empire, the Anglo-SAxon and Viking settlements of England, and the migrations of the religious refugees in the Reformation ...

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Race and Religion in American History: Conference at Princeton (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Race and Religion in American History: Conference at Princeton, March 7-8, 2014
PosterMost often when scholars of religion in America invoke “race,” they use the term to signal the inclusion of African Americans in their work rather than to mark a sustained engagement of racial categories, concepts, or the functions of race in a given context. In such cases, people of African descent alone bear the burden of racialization, and the failure to theorize race results in the reification of particularly American practices as obvious, transhistorical and universal. Even when scholars address “peoples of color” other than those of African ...

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Upcoming conference on religion and music seeks papers (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

This will be of interest to some readers of RiAH:
Proposals should be about 250 words long, should include the proposed title, audio-visual requirements, the author’s name, email address, and institutional affiliation, and should be sent to Monica Phonsavatdy (m.phonsavatdy@utoronto.ca) by February 23rd, 2014 (for first round), or April 27th (second round).

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CFP: Religion and Sexual Revolutions in the U.S. (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

By Monica L. Mercado


It's that time of year when course evaluations for the previous term roll in, and I've been pleasantly surprised by student reflections on my Fall 2013 course, Sex and Sexualities in Modern U.S. History, some articulating the goals of the course even more elegantly than I did:
I think there are some ways in which I previously thought of sexuality as a private matter between individuals, but this class has constantly challenged me to think about the multitude of ways in which larger cultural, economic, political, and religious forces have shaped individual’s sexual identities, experiences, ...

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The Cushwa Center’s Seminar in American Religion (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Heath Carter

Twice a year the University of Notre Dame's Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism hosts a Seminar in American Religion (SAR).  As many readers of this blog can testify, these are "can't miss" events.  All faculty within striking distance of South Bend are invited to participate; there are also a limited number of spaces available for graduate students.

The Seminar kicks off on a Friday evening with cocktails and dinner, and then picks up on Saturday morning with a three-hour discussion of a major new book in the field of American religion (note: if you register ...

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Call for Papers for the 2014 CFH Biennial Conferences (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

September 24-27, 2014

The CFH's 29th Biennial Conferences will be September 24-25 (Student Research Conference) and September 25-27 (Fall Conference) at Pepperdine University in Malibu CA. The conference theme will be "Christian Historians and Their Publics," and the general program chair is Jay Green, Covenant College TN. What follows are the calls for papers for both conferences. 

CALL FOR PAPERS

2014 CFH Undergraduate Student Conference
September 24-25, 2014

The Fall 2014 Biennial Meeting of the Conference on Faith and History at Pepperdine University in beautiful Malibu, California, will be preceded by a two-day Undergraduate Student Conference, the 24th and 25th ...

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Conceived in Doubt — Session at #AHA2014 #ASCH2014 (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Quick note -- for those you who read Mike Altman's post below previewing his comments at the AHA/ASCH panel on Amanda Porterfield's Conceived in Doubt: Religion and Politics in the New American Nation, they have now been updated to include all of his comments. You can also follow the basic thread of comments at the ASCH's live blog, which you can access here (you have to scroll backwards at the bottom of the page).

Over at his blog, John Fea has a number of correspondents writing in with impressions of various sessions at the AHA/ASCH, and John reports in ...

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UPDATED- Thomas Paine is My Spirit Animal: Comments on Porterfield’s Conceived in Doubt #AHA2014 #ASCH14 (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:



UPDATE- I have updated this post with my full comments from the panel for those who couldn't make it.

Since my day for a post this month coincides so nicely with the AHA and ASCH meetings I thought I'd kill two birds with one stone. Below is a draft and preview of my opening remarks as part of an AHA/ASCH roundtable on Amanda Porterfield's Conceived in Doubt tomorrow afternoon. If you're in D.C. for the meetings please come check out what promises to be an excellent discussion.

I stand here today with Thomas Paine as my ...

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Jews in America @ the 2013 AJS Conference in Boston, Dec. 15-17 (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Despite the incredible snow storm in Boston, this year's Association for Jewish Studies conference has begun!  (AJS meets in Boston, MA from Dec. 15-17, 2013) 

THATCamp.  Rumor has it that THATCamp was awesome this year, but since I was trapped for five extra hours in the air due to the storm,  I missed it.  Topics included pedagogy, Omeka, and new methods.

Debates about the Future of Gender Studies.  I did make it, however, to a fabulous discussion about the state of Jewish Women's and Gender Studies that included presentations by Chava Weissler (Lehigh), Americanist Joyce Antler ...

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Florida State Graduate Student Symposium, CFP (due December 31, 2013) (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:


Call for Papers:

The Florida State University Department of Religion 
13th Annual Graduate Student Symposium

February 21-23, 2014 • Tallahassee, Florida

The Florida State University Department of Religion is pleased to announce its 13th Annual Graduate Student Symposium to be held February 21-23, 2014 in Tallahassee, Florida. Last year’s symposium was a huge success, allowing over 60 presenters from over 18 universities and departments as varied as History, Political Science, Philosophy, Psychology, and Classics to share their research, learn from one another, and meet many of their peers and future colleagues.

This year’s symposium will be centered on the theme ...

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Vodou in the Early Republic: More Questions Than Answers (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:


Our guest post today is by John Davies, an adjunct assistant professor in the Intellectual Heritage Program at Temple University. His article, "Taking Liberties: Saint-Dominguan Slaves and Masters in Philadelphia, 1791-1805," will be appearing in Commodification, Community, and Comparison in Slave Studies, ed. Jeff Forret and Christine E. Sears (under contract with Louisiana State University Press).

By John Davies

On May 7, 1800, Calypso, a woman "aged about 30 years" from the French Caribbean colony of Saint-Domingue, was baptized in [Old] St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church in Philadelphia. With her baptism, she took the name Mary Claudia Calypso.[1] Calypso ...

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Authors Meet Critics Session on Color of Christ at the AAR: Monday, November 25, 9 – 11:30 a.m. (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Paul Harvey

Hoping to see lots of blog friends, readers, and followers at the American Academy of Religion in Baltimore coming up in less than two weeks. There's more stuff to do there in American religious history than one could possibly fairly summarize in a post (you may fine one helpful selective list of sessions here), but here just want to call your attention to the "Authors Meet Critics" session on Edward J. Blum's The Color of Christ, to be held Monday, November 25, 9 - 11:30 a.m., in Convention Center 310. The session is co-sponsored by the ...

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CFP: North American Undergraduate Conference in Religion and Philosophy (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Art Remillard

At last year's North American Undergraduate Conference in Religion and Philosophy (see pictures here), Matt Sayersa friend from my FSU daysbrought along a van full of students and faculty from Lebanon Valley College. Somewhere between the outstanding student papers and soaking in the brilliance of Randall Stephens's keynote address, I asked Matt to co-host the conference with me. To my good fortune, Matt agreed, even though I'm sure he's busy promoting his new book published with Oxford, Feeding the Dead: Ancestor Worship in Ancient India. From the looks of the CFP, ...

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Religion in New York (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

File:View of the Empire State Building from Macy's.jpgBy Carol Faulkner

The theme of this year's Researching New York: Perspectives on Empire State History conference is Religion in New York. "Researching New York" is an annual conference sponsored by the History Department at the State University of New York at Albany and the New York State Archives Partnership Trust. The program for this upcoming conference (November 14-15, register now!) looks fantastic.

The conference features two keynote speakers:

Robert Orsi, Northwestern University, "The Gods of Gotham: Religion and the Making of New York, 1800 to 1950." From the website: New York City is generally thought of as the very ...

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The Deep and Wide Worlds of Billy Graham (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

A hearty welcome to our new contributor Michael Hammond, Professor of History at Southeastern University, and an attendee at the recent Billy Graham Conference which we blogged about here before. Raised in Indiana, Michael did his MA with Mark Noll at Wheaton, and took his Ph.D. at the University of Arkansas. At Southeastern, he enjoys teaching Baseball and America, the Civil Rights Movement, and American Christianity and Culture Since 1945.  His research is on the intersection of race and religion, especially with regards to political movements.

Despite their areas of staunch disagreement, scholars of 20th century American evangelicalism ...

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Worlds of Billy Graham (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Karen Johnson.  

Next week, September 26-28, the Institute for the Study of American Evangelicals at Wheaton College will host a conference on The Worlds of Billy Graham.  The conference is one of the many outcomes of a two year grant from the Lilly Foundation to examine the life, impact and career of Billy Graham, and many participants of this blog will be interested (and in attendance).

The conference looks fantastic and the schedule is below.  For those who want a taste of the work of the scholars associated with this ISAE project without attending, go here to listen ...

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Worlds of Billy Graham (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Karen Johnson.  

Next week, September 26-28, the Institute for the Study of American Evangelicals at Wheaton College will host a conference on The Worlds of Billy Graham.  The conference is one of the many outcomes of a two year grant from the Lilly Foundation to examine the life, impact and career of Billy Graham, and many participants of this blog will be interested (and in attendance).

The conference looks fantastic and the schedule is below.  For those who want a taste of the work of the scholars associated with this ISAE project without attending, go here to listen ...

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Danforth Inaugural Lectures in Religion and Politics: Conference and Seminar (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Inaugural Danforth Distinguished Lectures in Religion and Politics

PROTESTANT FOREIGN MISSIONS and SECULARIZATION in MODERN AMERICA


David Hollinger, Preston Hotchkis Professor Emeritus
University of California at Berkeley
November 18-20, 2013



The John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics at Washington University in St. Louis is pleased to announce the First Danforth Distinguished Lectures to be held November 18-20 at Washington University in St. Louis. The Distinguished Lectures are convened to initiate and sustain ongoing discussion about multiple interactions between religion and politics in American public life and thought. The Lectures approach this objective by inviting a distinguished scholar to ...

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Religion in California: CFP (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:


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Native American and Indigenous Studies Association: Call for Papers (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

[the following comes to us from our friend Jennifer Graber at the University of Texas)

NATIVE AMERICAN & INDIGENOUS STUDIES ASSOCIATION

Hosted by the University of Texas at Austin
AUSTIN, TEXAS May 29-31, 2014

The NAISA Council invites scholars working in Native American and Indigenous Studies to submit proposals for: Individual papers, panel sessions, roundtables, or film screenings. 

All persons working in Native American and Indigenous Studies are invited and encouraged to apply.

Proposals are welcome from faculty and students in colleges, universities, and tribal colleges; from community-based scholars and elders; ...

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