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Posts Tagged ‘british’

British History in Lego (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

And now for some fun: James Pegrum has rendered his selection of key events in British history in the form of Lego vignettes. They're fun, they're growing in number, and you can see some in this report from Gizmodo...

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The British Museum’s Gay History Guide (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

The British Museum has, and will continue to, come in for a lot of criticism from people who want parts of its collection sent off around the world, but now they've started an initiative that's hard to fault. They've created a written and audio guide which discusses both the hidden and public story of homosexual life in the collection. Called 'A Little Gay History', it "explores artistic portrayals of what it means to be gay and the difficulties in finding records of same-sex desire." (Quote from this BBC article.)

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Notes on British WW1 Food (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

A curator at the British Royal Logistic Corps Museum has researched a new book on the feeding of their soldiers during World War 1. If you're interested in the subject, you could just buy his 'Feeding Tommy' by Andrew Robertshaw, or take a first look at this Telegraph article...

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Arctic Convoy Medals given by British Government (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

In a war full of tough jobs, the actions of the men who worked on the Arctic Convoys which took supplies from Britain into Russia were considered some of the toughest. However after the war, when medals were being issued, the men of the Arctic Convoys were overlooked because of the tensions with the Soviet Union (which had conquered Eastern Europe.) Now, almost seventy five years after the war began, the British government has issued the long delayed medals in the form of the Arctic Star, to survivors and relatives of the deceased.

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British women voted 75 years before 1918 suffrage (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

A dozen hand-written sheets in a box of old solicitor’s records in Lichfield, a cathedral city in Staffordshire, England, bear surprising witness to women voting in a local election in 1843, 11 years after the Great Reform Act restricted the parliamentary franchise to “male persons,” 8 years after the Municipal Corporations Act forbade women from voting in town council elections, 26 years before the Municipal Franchise Act re-granted women taxpayers (later restricted to single women or widows) the vote in local council elections, and a full 75 years before the 1918 Representation of the People Act granted women over ...

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Book Review of The Nine Years’ War and the British Army, 1688-1697: The Operations in the Low Countries (Military History)

An interesting history-related post from Military History:

Reblogged from International History:

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John Childs. The Nine Years' War and the British Army, 1688-1697: The Operations in the Low Countries. Manchester, England: Manchester University Press, 1991. ISBN 978-0-71903-461-9. Maps. Notes. Index. Pp. xii, 372.

The Nine Years' War was a major conflict between Louis XIV of France and a European-wide coalition consisting of Austria and the Holy Roman Empire, the Dutch Republic, Spain, Britain, and Savoy. 

Read more… 738 more words

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The Voices of British Soldiers (Boston 1775)

An interesting history-related post from Boston 1775:

Folks might recognize Don Hagist’s name from the British Soldiers, American War blog. He digs out details about the enlisted men who were part of the British government’s effort to hold onto those thirteen rebellious North American colonies. His research can turn some faceless redcoats into individual people.

Often that task involves paging through muster rolls, pension grants, court-martial records, and other British military documents now stored at the National Archives at Kew. Unfortunately, there’s no British equivalent to the American pension application system, which (in lieu of systematic record-keeping during the war) required veterans to provide detailed ...

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British Columbia conference on Doctrine of Discovery (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

A conference entitled the International Seminar on the Doctrine of Discovery is being cohosted by the Shuswap Nation Tribal Council and Thompson Rivers University on September 20th and 21st in Kamlopps British Columbia.

The conference will address how the colonial doctrine of discovery continues to form the foundation of North American legal systems and how this concept has been used within legal and political cultures around the world to subjugate Indigenous law, governments, and sovereignty. Speakers include lawyers and academics, many of whom have presented on the doctrine of discovery before the United Nations. There will also be a number of ...

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Have a Quick British History Test (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

The British government is changing its citizenship test to include more questions on British history, and this has prompted the Guardian to post a quiz. It's not the actual quiz people will take, but it's been provided by a publishing company who provide citizenship study guides. There are fifteen questions given, you'll need ten right to pass, and they don't charge the £50 fee. I'm fully aware it's a little bit of fun for me, but deadly serious to others.

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Terrible Vandalism Figures for British Heritage (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

Two British universities, together with the Council for British Archaeology, have carried out a survey on the levels of vandalism and damage being caused to heritage sites on the island. The results are horrifying: 18.7% were physically damaged by 'crime', which equates to 70,000 buildings, while 8% of these suffered 'substantial' damage. Three in eight churches suffered, as did 22.7% of grade I or II listed buildings. Simon Thurley, Chief Executive of English Heritage, explained "Whilst heritage is not necessarily being targeted over other places, save perhaps for their valuable materials and artefacts, they are suffering a substantial rate of ...

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Lost Darwin fossil slides found in British archive (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

Fossil wood Darwin collected on the Island of Chiloe, Chile in 1834University of London paleontologist Dr. Howard Falcon-Lang was looking through an old cabinet in the British Geological Survey archives for some carboniferous fossil-wood specimens. He opened a drawer labeled “unregistered fossil plants” and found hundreds of glass slides of thin, polished fossil plant sections. He fished out a slide and examined it with a flashlight, finding to his great shock the signature of one C. Darwin, Esq. That slide turned out to be a piece of fossilized wood Darwin had collected during his now-iconic voyage on the HMS Beagle in 1834.

The cabinet contained 314 slides of fossils collected by ...

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British Library puts 4 Million Pages of Old Newspaper Online (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

I've mentioned the British Library's plans to digitise its entire collection of newspapers before, so I'm pleased to report that four million pages of print has now gone online. Searching is free, viewing a page will cost a little, but the material is from eighteenth and nineteenth century papers which includes local material such as the Manchester Evening News.

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British Library hit 500 Manuscripts Online (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

Since September 2010, the British Library has been digitising manuscripts and placing the results online. They have now uploaded their five hundredth item, and this blog post has a sample ...

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Inter-American Commission on Human Rights to hear complaint of British Columbia First Nations (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights of the Organization of American States (OAS) will hear a complaint brought by six First Nations that charges Canada with the uncompensated taking of their ancestral territory to benefit private forestry and development corporations on Vancouver Island.

The Hul’qumi’num Treaty Group (HTG), comprised of the Cowichan Tribes, Lake Cowichan First Nation, Halalt First Nation, Penelakut Tribe, Lyackson First Nation and the Stz’uminus First Nation, has accused Canada of violating the human rights of its 6,400 members by failing to recognize and protect their rights to property, culture and religion, as recognized under the OAS’ ...

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1600 Folders of Documents Missing from British Archives? (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

According to this article from the Telegraph, which appears to be drawing on a freedom of information request, there are 1,600 folders of documents missing from Britain's National Archives. Documents relating to Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, Churchill and D-Day are all reported absent, many having not been seen since the early 1990s. Now, we're probably not talking about theft here, as an Archives spokesmen said most of the papers are probably still in the Archives but on the wrong shelves or on loan somewhere.

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Details on this Year’s Festival of British Archaeology (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

This year's Festival of British Archaeology is running from July 16th to 31st. It's a chance to get to museums and digs for special events and indulge, or discover, a passion for archaeology. There are "events ranging from excavation open days and behind-the-scenes tours to family fun days, hands-on activities, guided walks, talks and finds identification workshops take place all over the UK during this special fortnight." You can find more information on their website...

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British Spanish Civil War Records Free for Short Period (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

The National Archives in Britain has placed material online relating to volunteers in the Spanish Civil War. While Britain stayed neutral, thousands of men and women travelled to Spain to fight and help, and the British secret services gathered information on them. These lists of volunteers, records and casualty lists are now available for free for a limited time. If you think you had a British relative involved, this is the place to start.

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NEW PBS DOCUMENTARY “THE WAR OF 1812” EXPLORES THE TRUTH AND MYTHMAKING OF HISTORY (Military History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Military History Blog:

— Television Program Presents American, Canadian, British and Native Perspectives, Leading the Way of Bicentennial Activities, Airs October 10 —

WASHINGTON, D.C. and BUFFALO, NY — Nearly two centuries after it was fought, the two-and-a-half year conflict that forged the destiny of a continent comes to public television in a comprehensive film history.  “The War of 1812” airs on PBS stations nationwide on Monday, October 10, 2011 at 9 p.m. ET (check local listings).  From 1812 to 1815, Americans battled against the British, Canadian colonists, and Native warriors; the outcomes shaped the geography and the identity of North America.  This ...

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British Prime Minister: ‘We won’t send Elgin Marbles back’ (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

A question in the British Houses of Parliament about Greece's potential financial meltdown took on an historical air when it was finished by a call to return the Elgin / Parthenon Marbles back to Greece. The marbles had been bought by Lord Elgin from the region's then owners, but the current Greek government would like them back. British Prime Minister David Cameron responded "I'm afraid I don't agree ... the short answer is that we're not going to lose them." (Cited from the Guardian) You can read more about the marbles here, and give your view here.

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Sarah Palin on Paul Revere: Did Paul Revere Warn the British? (American Revolution & Founding Era)

An interesting history-related post from American Revolution & Founding Era:

Americans love a good laugh. And picking on public figures is often a source of great laughs. Not surprisingly, when a public figure serves up a delicious gaffe, we are all too eager to pounce on it. Former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin provided such an opportunity for amusement when she said recently that Paul Revere "warned the British" and implied that he rang some bells as part of his warning. Here is a video excerpt of Palin's gaffe...

First, let's all agree that Palin's off-the-cuff remarks demonstrated she had only a vague understanding of the events surrounding Boston in April ...

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British Library buys email archive (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

There isn't too much unusual in the news that the British Library has purchased a poet's archive, but what's interesting about their acquisition of Wendy Cope's is that it includes 40,000 emails, their largest purchase of electronic material so far. If you're as interested as I am in how we're going to record e exchanges for future historians, give this article a look...

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Archaeologists Write to British Government over Attack on Research (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

Forty professors of archaeology have written to the British government protesting about a ridiculous piece of legislation which forces all human remains uncovered at archaeological digs in England and Wales to be reburied within two years no matter what they are. Clearly, this risks leaving archaeologists without enough time to study the bones properly, and destroying them so no further research can be done. For instance, over fifty sets of bones thousands of years old were discovered at Stonehenge in 2008; under the new laws, Britain risks never finding out as much as they could about these groups as scientific ...

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1767 — Letter II From a Farmer in Pennsylvania to the Inhabitants of the British Colonies by John Dickinson

Editorial published in colonial newspapers
1767

MY DEAR COUNTRYMEN,

There is another late Act of Parliament, which appears to me to be unconstitutional and as destructive to the liberty of these colonies, as that mentioned in my last letter; that is, the Act for granting the duties on paper, glass, etc.

The Parliament unquestionably possesses a legal authority to regulate the trade of Great Britain and all her colonies. Such an authority is essential to the relation between a mother country and her colonies; and necessary for the common good of all. He, who considers these provinces as States distinct from the British Empire, has very slender notions of justice, or of their interests. We are but parts of a whole, and therefore there must exist a power somewhere to preside, and preserve the connexion due order. This power is lodged in the Parliament; and we are as much dependent on Great Britain as a perfectly free people can be on another.

I have looked over every statute relating to these colonies, from their first settlement to this time; and I find every one of them founded on this principle till the Stamp Act administration. All before are calculated to regulate trade and preserve or promote a mutually beneficial intercourse between the several constituent parts of the Empire; and though many of them imposed duties on trade, yet those duties were always imposed with design to restrain the commerce of one part, that was injurious to another, and thus to promote the general welfare. The raising a revenue thereby was never intended. Thus the king, by his judges in his courts of justice, imposes fines which all together amount to a very considerable sum and contribute to the support of government: but this is merely a consequence arising from restrictions that only meant to keep peace and prevent confusion; and surely a man would argue very loosely, who should conclude from hence that the king has a right to levy money in general upon his subjects. Never did the British Parliament, till the period above mentioned, think of imposing duties in America for the purpose of raising a revenue. Mr. Grenville first introduced this language, in the preamble to the 4 Geo. III, c. 15, which has these words: “And whereas it is just and necessary that a revenue be raised in Your Majesty’s said dominions in America, for defraying the expences of defending, protecting, and securing the same: We, Your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Commons of Great Britain, in Parliament assembled, being desirous to make some provision in this present session of Parliament, towards raising the said revenue in America, have resolved to give and grant unto Your Majesty the several rates and duties herein after mentioned,” etc.

A few months after came the Stamp Act, which reciting this, proceeds in the same strange mode of expression, thus: “And whereas it is just and necessary that provision be made for raising a further revenue within Your Majesty’s dominions in America, towards defraying the said expences, we Your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Commons of Great Britain, etc., give and grant,” etc., as before.

The last Act, granting duties upon paper, etc., carefully pursues these modern precedents. The preamble is, ” Whereas it is expedient that a revenue should be raised in Your Majesty’s dominions in America, for making a more certain and adequate provision for defraying the charge of the administration of justice, and the support of civil government in such provinces, where it shall be found necessary; and towards the further defraying the expences of defending, protecting, and securing the said dominions, we Your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal subjects, the Commons of Great Britain, etc., give and grant,” etc., as before.

Here we may observe an authority expressly claimed and exerted to impose duties on these colonies; not for the regulation of trade; not for the preservation or promotion of a mutually beneficial intercourse between the several constituent parts of the Empire, heretofore the sole objects of parliamentary institutions; but for the single purpose of levying money upon us.

This I call an innovation; and a most dangerous innovation. It may perhaps be objected that Great Britain has a right to lay what duties she pleases upon her exports, and it makes no difference to us whether they are paid here or there. To this I answer: these colonies require many things for their use, which the laws of Great Britain prohibit them from getting anywhere but from her. Such are paper and glass. That we may legally be bound to pay any general duties on these commodities relative to the regulation of trade, is granted; but we being obliged by the laws to take from Great Britain any special duties imposed on their exportation to us only, with intention to raise a revenue from us only, are as much taxes upon us as those imposed by the Stamp Act.

What is the difference in substance and right whether the same sum is raised upon us by the rates mentioned in the Stamp Act, on the use of paper, or by these duties on the importation of it ? It is only the edition of a former book, shifting a sentence from the end to the beginning.

Suppose the duties were made payable in Great Britain.

It signifies nothing to us, whether they are to be paid here or there. Had the Stamp Act directed that all the paper should be landed at Florida, and the duties paid there before it was brought to the British colonies, would the Act have raised less money upon us, or have been less destructive of our rights? By no means: for as we were under a necessity of using the paper, we should have been under the necessity of paying the duties. Thus, in the present case, a like necessity will subject us, if this Act continues in force, to the payment of the duties now imposed.

Why was the Stamp Act then so pernicious to freedom? It did not enact, that every man in the colonies should buy a certain quantity of paper – No: It only directed that no instrument of writing should be valid in law if not made on stamped paper.

The makers of that Act knew full well that the confusions that would arise from the disuse of writings would compel the colonies to use the stamped paper, and therefore to pay the taxes imposed. For this reason the Stamp Act was said to be a law that would execute itself. For the very same reason, the last Act of Parliament, if it is granted to have any force here, will execute itself, and will be attended with the very same consequences to American liberty. Some persons perhaps may say that this Act lays us under no necessity to pay the duties imposed, because we may ourselves manufacture the articles on which they are laid; whereas by the Stamp Act no instrument of writing could be good, unless made on British paper, and that too stamped.

* * *

Great Britain has prohibited the manufacturing iron and steel in these colonies, without any objection being made to her right of doing it. The like right she must have to prohibit any other manufacture among us. Thus she is possessed of an undisputed precedent on that point. This authority, she will say, is founded on the original intention of settling these colonies; that is, that we should manufacture for them, and that they should supply her with materials. The equity of this policy, she will also say, has been universally acknowledged by the colonies, who never have made the least objections to statutes for that purpose; and will further appear by the mutual benefits flowing from this usage ever since the settlement of these colonies.

Our great advocate Mr. Pitt, in his speeches on the debate concerning the repeal of the Stamp Act, acknowledged that Great Britain could restrain our manufactures. His words are these: “This kingdom, the supreme governing and legislative power, has always bound the colonies by her regulations and restrictions in trade, in navigation, in manufactures – in everything, except that of taking their money out of their pockets, without their consent.” Again he says: “We may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets, without their consent.”

Here then, my dear countrymen, ROUSE yourselves, and behold the ruin hanging over your heads. If you ONCE admit that Great Britain may lay duties upon her exportations to us, for the purpose of levying money on us only, she then will have nothing to do but to lay those duties on the articles which she prohibits us to manufacture – and the tragedy of American liberty is finished. We have been prohibited from procuring manufactures, in all cases, anywhere but from Great Britain (excepting linens, which we are permitted to import directly from Ireland). We have been prohibited in some cases from manufacturing for ourselves, and may be prohibited in others. We are therefore exactly in the situation of a city besieged, which is surrounded by the works of the besiegers in every part but one. If that is closed up, no step can be taken, but to surrender at discretion. If Great Britain can order us to come to her for necessaries we want, and can order us to pay what taxes she pleases before we take them away, or when we land them here, we are as abject slaves as France and Poland can show in wooden shoes and with uncombed hair.

Perhaps the nature of the necessities of dependent states, caused by the policy of a governing one, for her own benefit, may be elucidated by a fact mentioned in history. When the Carthaginians were possessed of the island of Sardinia, they made a decree, that the Sardinians should not raise corn, nor get it any other way than from the Carthaginians. Then, by imposing any duties they would upon it, they drained from the miserable Sardinians any sums they pleased; and whenever that oppressed people made the least movement to assert their liberty, their tyrants starved them to death or submission. This may be called the most perfect kind of political necessity.

A FARMER.

British Surrender at Yorktown (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

On October 19, 1781, the British surrendered at Yorktown thereby ending the American Revolution. The roots of the war can be traced all the way back to the aftereffects of the French and Indian War (1754-1763). However, open warfare did not begin until 1775 with the battles at Lexington and Concord.

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