AP History Notes

Posts Tagged ‘archives’

Know Your Archives: American Friends Service Committee Or Friends in Low Places (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Today's post is a continuation of our "Know Your Archives" Series. Previous posts include information about the National Archives at College Park, American Antiquarian Society, LDS Church History Archives (and others related to the next generation of Mormon Studies), and the Archdiocese of New York, to name only a few. Readers embarking on their own research trips are invited to submit "Know Your Archives" pieces to Cara.

Our guest contributor is Guy Aiken, a PhD Candidate in American Religions at the University of Virginia. Guy's dissertation, "Quaker Relief and the Politics of Neutrality, 1919-1941: ...

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Roman Sources for the History of American Catholicism: A New Perspective (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:


This month Cushwa welcomes Matteo Binasco, who has been working as a postdoctoral fellow based in Rome since September 2014. He holds a PhD from the National University of Ireland in Galway, and his research focuses on missionary expansion within the Atlantic area; Irish communities within the Italian peninsula; and Irish communities in the Caribbean during the early modern period. Matteo recently helped to organize a symposium in Rome on Roman Sources for the Study of Global Irish Catholicism. His primary project for Cushwa, however, has been the massive task of compiling a guide for English-speaking historians to the ...

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H-Net Book Review and MSUL Research Opportunties (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Today's guest post comes from Bobby Smiley, the Digital Scholarship and American History Librarian at the Michigan State University Libraries. Before joining the MSUL in November 2013, he was a library science and digital humanities graduate student at the Pratt Institute, where he also interned at Columbia working on the NYC Religion web archiving project. Previously, Bobby received his M.A. in Religion from Yale, where he studied with Kathryn Lofton, and researched changing historiographical trends in American Church/religious history using Sydney Ahlstrom’s lecture notes. His current research interests include finding ways to read algorithmically historiographical patterns at scale and over time, ...

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Grant Announcement: The Historical Society of The Episcopal Church (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Michael Utzinger



The Historical Society of the Episcopal Church invites applications from individual scholars and academic and ecclesiastical groups for grants to support significant research, conferences, and publications relating to the history of the Church of England, the worldwide Anglican Communion, and Anglican and Episcopal churches in North America.

Grants are usually modest, generally $1,000-$2,000, though more or less may be awarded depending on number of awards and amount of funds available in any year. Typical grants include travel to archives, collections or resources, dissertation research, and seed money for larger projects.

The deadline for submission is May 1, 2015.

...

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Amusing Archive Finds (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Emily Suzanne Clark

How many times have you read something in the archives or in a primary source that made you smile, chuckle, or even lol? For some research topics, the answer might be never. But hopefully everyone finds topics for the classroom that allow us to think about funny things in American religious history.

This is on my mind because in both my courses last week, Religions in America and African American Religions, my students had primary source readings that made some of them (and me) chuckle. Last week in my African American Religions class, students read excerpts from the ...

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Menopause as Crisis: Gender and the Spiritualist Body (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Carol Faulkner

Andrew Jackson Davis, Clairvoyant Physician

As a young, and increasingly famous, clairvoyant, eighteen-year-old Andrew Jackson Davis learned how to heal. Though he had little formal education, he communicated with the ancient Greek physician Galen (d. circa 200 AD) while in a trance state. From Galen, Davis learned physiology, medicine, and how to treat diseases with a rod. Renouncing any economic motives, he decided to use his powers to help others, writing "I seemed to be a sort of a connecting link between the patient's disease and its exact counterpart (or remedy) in the constitution of external Nature" (From ...

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Rome in America: Reflections on the 2014 Rome Seminar (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

(Today's post is by Cassandra L. Yacovazzi, who just this month defended her dissertation and received a Ph.D. in History from the University of Missouri -- our congratulations to her! Cassandra joined 23 scholars (graduate students, professors, and archivists) in Rome from June 6-19, 2014, for the 2014 Rome Seminar, sponsored by the Cushwa Center as well as several other entities at the University of Notre Dame: Italian Studies, the Nanovic Institute for European Studies, the College of Arts and Letters, and the Office of Research. The Cushwa Center, which already offers the Peter R. D'Agostino Research Travel Grant ...

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In Good Faith, a Collaborative Research Project of the ATLA: Results! (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Emily Suzanne Clark


A while back I posted here about a collaborative research project overseen by the American Theological Library Association, the Catholic Library Association, and the Association of Jewish Librarians and funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The project, "In Good Faith: Collection Care, Preservation, and Access in Small Theological and Religious Studies Libraries" focused on the creation, distribution, and analysis of a survey focused on the care and preservation needs and challenges of small religious studies libraries. Our goal was to collect information from the librarians and archivists at small religious ...

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Rhetoric, Religion, and the Civil Rights Movement — 2 volumes now! (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Paul Harvey

Scholars interested in religion and the civil rights movement need to be aware of a couple of primary source compilations. One is a nice 2-vol. book (vol II of which has just come out), and one consists of some newly digitized interviews that have been part of the Stanford Special Collections archive, now available online. Together they provide some of the best and most accessible material on this subject that we've ever had. (I would also mention the transcribed oral history collections from the University of Southern Mississippi --covering not just the civil rights movement but Katrina and ...

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Know Your Archive: National Archives at College Park (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Michael Graziano

Today's guest contributor is Michael Graziano, a Ph.D. Candidate at Florida State University. His dissertation explores the relationship between American religious institutions and U.S. intelligence services during the Cold War. You can find him on Twitter @grazmike.

I recently had the chance to spend an extended period of time working at the National Archives at College Park (or Archives II, as it is sometimes known). My experience was fantastic. I came away with oodles of quality material, and the archivists and support staff were wonderful. Yet, in talking with other ARH scholars about working at College Park, I’ve ...

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Know Your Archives: The Next Generation of Mormon Studies (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Today's guest post is from Tom Simpson, who holds a Ph.D. in religious studies from the University of Virginia. He teaches religion, ethics, and philosophy at Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire. His most recent published article is "The Death of Mormon Separatism in American Universities, 1877-1896" (Religion and American Culture), and his forthcoming book is entitled Authority, Ambition, and the Mormon Mind: American Universities and the Evolution of Mormonism, 1867-1940.
 A little over a decade ago, as I was preparing for a doctoral exam in U.S. religious history, I started wrestling with some of the questions that ...

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Teaching Religion in the History of U.S. Sexuality (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:


By Monica L. Mercado

Teaching in the archives. Photograph by Dan Dry,
courtesy of the University of Chicago Magazine.
While those of you on semesters are nearly wading into midterms, tomorrow is the first day of classes on the quarter system here at the University of Chicago. I'll be teaching one class this term for the University's Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, "Sex and Sexualities in Modern U.S. History." Ten weeks is not a lot of time for a discussion-based survey course, which is why I decided to focus primarily on the twentieth century. We have ...

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Teaching Religion in the History of U.S. Sexuality (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:


By Monica L. Mercado

Teaching in the archives. Photograph by Dan Dry,
courtesy of the University of Chicago Magazine.
While those of you on semesters are nearly wading into midterms, tomorrow is the first day of classes on the quarter system here at the University of Chicago. I'll be teaching one class this term for the University's Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, "Sex and Sexualities in Modern U.S. History." Ten weeks is not a lot of time for a discussion-based survey course, which is why I decided to focus primarily on the twentieth century. We have ...

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Know Your Archives: Learning to Read in Bethlehem (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Today’s guest post comes from David Komline, a doctoral candidate at the University of Notre Dame.  His dissertation, “The Common School Awakening: Education, Religion, and Reform in Transatlantic Perspective, 1800-1848,” examines the religious influences behind a movement for state-sponsored schools that stretched from Germany, through France and Britain, to America.  His base for the 2013-2014 academic year will be the University of Heidelberg.  

David Komline

After finishing my master’s degree and before beginning doctoral work I studied for a year at the University of Tübingen in Germany, where I spent many hours in the library, pouring over old ...

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Know Your Archives: Archdiocese of New York Edition (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

This afternoon's post comes from our newest contributor, Monica L. Mercado, who is currently finishing her Ph.D. in the Department of History at the University of Chicago. You can find more details about her research and teaching interests in women's and gender history at monicalmercado.com.

Monica L. Mercado

Regular readers of this blog might remember that I'm spending much of the summer in New York State, hunting down the women (and men) of the Catholic Summer School of America while finishing the draft of my dissertation project, "Women and the Word: Gender, Print, and Catholic Identity in Nineteenth-Century ...

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Secularists All!, or, Writing Religion and Diplomacy after Preston (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:


Mark Edwards
Andrew Preston’s Sword of the Spirit, Shield of Faith (Anchor, 2012)  is a monumental achievement in the field of religion and politics—testified to by its winning of Canada’s Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Nonfiction.  A significant accomplishment for a country with (WARNING: 30 Rock reference, not author's opinion) only 700 words in their dictionary.   In many ways, Swordrepresents the capstone on ...

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Chasing Widows (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Today's guest post is by Jim Lutzweiler, an archivist at the Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.  In the post, he shares some stories about chasing widows in order to obtain collections, as well as some of the exciting holdings at the seminary.  I met Jim at the AP Grading, and have gotten to know him by running the camera for some oral history interviews in Chicago.  I can guarantee that if you do research at this archive, you'll hear some great stories if Jim is not off chasing widows.  Jim can be reached at jlutzweiler@sebts.edu.