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Posts Tagged ‘archives’

Know Your Archives: The Next Generation of Mormon Studies (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Today's guest post is from Tom Simpson, who holds a Ph.D. in religious studies from the University of Virginia. He teaches religion, ethics, and philosophy at Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire. His most recent published article is "The Death of Mormon Separatism in American Universities, 1877-1896" (Religion and American Culture), and his forthcoming book is entitled Authority, Ambition, and the Mormon Mind: American Universities and the Evolution of Mormonism, 1867-1940.
 A little over a decade ago, as I was preparing for a doctoral exam in U.S. religious history, I started wrestling with some of the questions that ...

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Teaching Religion in the History of U.S. Sexuality (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:


By Monica L. Mercado

Teaching in the archives. Photograph by Dan Dry,
courtesy of the University of Chicago Magazine.
While those of you on semesters are nearly wading into midterms, tomorrow is the first day of classes on the quarter system here at the University of Chicago. I'll be teaching one class this term for the University's Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, "Sex and Sexualities in Modern U.S. History." Ten weeks is not a lot of time for a discussion-based survey course, which is why I decided to focus primarily on the twentieth century. We have ...

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Teaching Religion in the History of U.S. Sexuality (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:


By Monica L. Mercado

Teaching in the archives. Photograph by Dan Dry,
courtesy of the University of Chicago Magazine.
While those of you on semesters are nearly wading into midterms, tomorrow is the first day of classes on the quarter system here at the University of Chicago. I'll be teaching one class this term for the University's Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, "Sex and Sexualities in Modern U.S. History." Ten weeks is not a lot of time for a discussion-based survey course, which is why I decided to focus primarily on the twentieth century. We have ...

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Know Your Archives: Learning to Read in Bethlehem (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Today’s guest post comes from David Komline, a doctoral candidate at the University of Notre Dame.  His dissertation, “The Common School Awakening: Education, Religion, and Reform in Transatlantic Perspective, 1800-1848,” examines the religious influences behind a movement for state-sponsored schools that stretched from Germany, through France and Britain, to America.  His base for the 2013-2014 academic year will be the University of Heidelberg.  

David Komline

After finishing my master’s degree and before beginning doctoral work I studied for a year at the University of Tübingen in Germany, where I spent many hours in the library, pouring over old ...

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Know Your Archives: Archdiocese of New York Edition (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

This afternoon's post comes from our newest contributor, Monica L. Mercado, who is currently finishing her Ph.D. in the Department of History at the University of Chicago. You can find more details about her research and teaching interests in women's and gender history at monicalmercado.com.

Monica L. Mercado

Regular readers of this blog might remember that I'm spending much of the summer in New York State, hunting down the women (and men) of the Catholic Summer School of America while finishing the draft of my dissertation project, "Women and the Word: Gender, Print, and Catholic Identity in Nineteenth-Century ...

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Secularists All!, or, Writing Religion and Diplomacy after Preston (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:


Mark Edwards
Andrew Preston’s Sword of the Spirit, Shield of Faith (Anchor, 2012)  is a monumental achievement in the field of religion and politics—testified to by its winning of Canada’s Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Nonfiction.  A significant accomplishment for a country with (WARNING: 30 Rock reference, not author's opinion) only 700 words in their dictionary.   In many ways, Swordrepresents the capstone on ...

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Chasing Widows (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Today's guest post is by Jim Lutzweiler, an archivist at the Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.  In the post, he shares some stories about chasing widows in order to obtain collections, as well as some of the exciting holdings at the seminary.  I met Jim at the AP Grading, and have gotten to know him by running the camera for some oral history interviews in Chicago.  I can guarantee that if you do research at this archive, you'll hear some great stories if Jim is not off chasing widows.  Jim can be reached at jlutzweiler@sebts.edu.