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Posts Tagged ‘amp’

Of Comets and Connoisseurs. Art History Meets Astrophysics. (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

Sherlock Holmes famously said to Dr Watson that he didn’t know the earth went round the sun. From time to time in the canon of stories, Holmes's ignorance of astronomy is refuted. There was a clever use of this in the BBC’s Sherlock where the outcome of a case, as well as somebody’s life, depended upon Holmes deciphering a  painting like a connoisseur. After scanning the signature, the facture and other parts of the canvas, it suddenly hit the detective that a series of paint splotches were arrayed in the shape of an astronomical cluster. The fraudster-artist having a ...

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"Political Catholics," Católicos Por La Raza & Remembering the Chicano Moratorium (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Arlene M. Sánchez Walsh

I was around 7 years old, it was my birthday party and my first self-realization of who I was became clear as my father, never an activist type, placed a "Chicano Power" patch on my blouse. The brown raised fist was nothing I was familiar with, and nothing I had seen anyone in my family wear--so the curiosity was planted--what was this Chicano Power? and why interrupt my birthday party with such political symbolism certainly totally lost on all of us 7-year olds lining up for the piñata?                ...

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A.A. Allen: God’s Man of Faith & Power (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Arlene Sanchez-Walsh
43 years ago this month,  A.A. Allen died in San Francisco, of acute alcoholism allegedly surrounded by empty pill bottles.  Allen was a tent evangelist who hit his stride in the 1960s and 70s. Previous to that, he was converted in a Methodist church in the 1930s after a hardscrabble childhood, where by his own admissions, Allen was smoking, drinking, and “carousing” with women by the tender age of 12.  Allen became Pentecostal in the 1940s and joined the Assemblies of God, where after a few pastoral appointments, he settled in Corpus Christi, Texas.  Allen became a healing ...

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Teaching the complete history of the United States – Lewis & Clark and Manifest Destiny (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

American Indians and tribal nations have been too long overlooked in the teaching and scholarship of the history of the United States. I have written about the crucial role that indigenous peoples and nations played, for example, in the Lewis and Clark expedition and in American Manifest Destiny.  Robert J. Miller, Native America, Discovered and Conquered: Thomas Jefferson, Lewis & Clark, and Manifest Destiny (Prager Publishers, 2006; paperback University of Nebraska Press, 2008). 

I am posting here a list of primary documents that teachers should consider using to teach a more complete, wholistic, diverse, and true history of these events.

1. Papal documents ...

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Hear Nightingale, Tennyson & Light Brigade bugler (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

The Charge of the Light Brigade was a famous debacle. It was a cavalry charge at the Battle of Balaklava (October 25th, 1854) in the Crimean War and it was a slaughter. The British cavalry, armed solely with sabres, was ordered — either through poor communication or officer arrogance or incompetence or a little bit of everything — to charge down a valley and attack Russian artillery batteries. The Russians had 20 infantry battalions, fifty large artillery pieces and they held the heights on both sides of the valley, so these poor Light Brigade guys had to race through a ...

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American Masters Features Sister Rosetta Tharpe: The Godmother of Rock & Roll (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Paul Harvey

I already know what you're going to be doing Friday evening, February 22nd. Here's what you're going to be doing: at home, watching this "American Masters" documentary on the incomparable Sister Rosetta Tharpe. A little excerpt from the promotional material:

American Masters opens its 27th season with the story of African-American gospel singer and guitar virtuoso Sister Rosetta Tharpe (March 20, 1915 – October 9, 1973). One of the most influential musicians of the 20th century, Tharpe may not be a household name today, but the flamboyant superstar, with her spectacular playing on ...

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Vintage postcards, the Michelin Man & fighting TB (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

It all started with an exhibition at the Boston Museum of Fine Art. I’ve mentioned before that I am an avid lover and collector of postcards, so whenever a museum puts on a show of vintage postcards, I go full obsessive and try to hunt down as many pictures of it as humanly possible. The Postcard Age at the MFA looks like a particularly great display of hundreds of carefully selected gems from the massive collection of Leonard A. Lauder, the billionaire chairman emeritus of Estée Lauder Companies, Inc., and son of legendary cosmetics entrepreneur Estée.

Lauder has been collecting ...

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What the Heck Barnes & Noble (USHistoryFiles - American History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from USHistoryFiles - American History Blog:

I like books…see??…  This is about half of my book collection.  (BTW, if anyone knows of a good & inexpensive piece of book tracking software let me know.)

As I said I like books.  So when the missus told me she got a 15% coupon from Barnes & Noble, I decided that I would head over and pick up a copy of Earl J. Hess’ new book on the Knoxville Campaign.  And off to Barnes & Noble I went.  My first surprise was that it seems the local store has decimated their US History section.  Compared to what it ...

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Guns taken from Bonnie & Clyde’s bodies for sale (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

Clyde Barrow's 1911 Colt .45Two Colt handguns that Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker were carrying when they were ambushed and killed in a hail of bullets on May 23, 1934 are coming up for auction in September. RR Auction in Amherst, New Hampshire has already opened Clyde’s Colt .45 1911 Government Model semi-automatic pistol and Bonnie’s Colt Detective Special .38 revolver to online bidders; the auction closes on Sunday September 30, 2012.

Bonnie Parker's 1933 Colt Detective Special .38Unlike the Winchester shotgun and the Thompson sub-machine gun confiscated from the Barrow gang’s Joplin hideout that were sold at auction earlier this year, these handguns are directly connected to Bonnie ...

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Hatfields & McCoys debuts on the History Channel (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

Bill Paxton as Randolph McCoy with familyThe feud between the Hatfield and McCoy families of Appalachia has transcended its origins as a bloody multi-generational backcountry conflict to become a metaphor for all vendettas. Yet, despite its lexical fame and inherent drama, it has rarely been depicted on television outside of documentaries, cartoons (Bugs Bunny, The Flintstones and Scooby-Doo have all done versions) and a particularly awesome episode arc of Family Feud. Kevin Costner as Devil Anse HatfieldStarting Monday at 9:00 PM EST, the History Channel will step into that void with Hatfields & McCoys, a three-episode miniseries starring Kevin Costner as William Anderson “Devil Anse” Hatfield and ...

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Lewis & Clark Law Review issue on international law and Indigenous Peoples (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

On April 15, 2011, Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland Oregon put on a day long symposium entitled

The Future of International Law in Indigenous Affairs: The Doctrine of Discovery, the United Nations, and the Organization of American States

Speakers from Canada and the United States discussed various aspects of this theme.

Lewis & Clark Law Review has now published the papers that came out of that conference.  In adddition, Maori and New Zealand professor Jacinta Ruru contributed a piece to the symposium issue.

Here is a short description of the articles and links to where you can download them.

...

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Lewis & Clark in the U.S. Supreme Court? (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

The Washington Post reported in November that the United States Supreme Court will have to decide what Lewis & Clark thought about three rivers in Montana to decide an upcoming case.

And the newspaper was correct.  Today, Feb, 22, the Court decided, using the Lewis & Clark journals, that the river was not navigable due to the Great Falls of the Missouri River and thus the state of Montana does not own the bed of the river and cannot tax PPL Montana for hydroeletric dams that it built upon parts of that river bed. http://www.law.cornell.edu/supremecourt/text/10-218#writing-10-218_OPINION_3

 

Here was the way the ...

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“Whether there be a Distinction between such as are Slaves & those who are free?” (Boston 1775)

An interesting history-related post from Boston 1775:

Although the Continental Congress decided not to order Gen. George Washington to discharge all black soldiers he found in the Continental Army when he arrived in Massachusetts in July 1775, that doesn’t meant that American governments were okay with the idea of African-Americans in arms.

In fact, on 8 July, less than a week after the new commander’s arrival, the Massachusetts Provincial Congress told officers recruiting new men: “You are not to enlist any deserter from the Ministerial Army, nor any stroller, negro, or vagabond, or person suspected of being an enemy to the liberty of America, nor any ...

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U.S. Departments of Justice & Interior Finalize Tribal Justice Plan (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

The U.S. Departments of Justice (DOJ) and Interior (DOI) have released the congressionally-mandated Long Term Plan to Build and Enhance Tribal Justice Systems, in accordance with sections 211, 241, and 244 of the Tribal Law and Order Act. DOJ and DOI were mandated by Congress to develop long-term plans to address incarceration in Indian Country and alternatives to incarceration.

You can access the official “Dear Tribal Leader” letter announcing the plan that was sent on Monday, August 8, 2011 and the Tribal Justice Plan at this web site.

National Congress of American Indians’ Tribal Law & Order Resource Center

...

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Space, Symbol, Dreams & Death in the Artist’s Studio (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

Continuing this series of posts on the artist’s studio with the most speculative one yet. A few themes are explored here; my favourite is the relationship between the painter’s creativity and dreams, a strand of my research.

The Mental Studio

“The studio is no more than a container, a kind of equipment, a room in which to paint or sculpt, a necessary space. In its isolation the artist watches a painting or sculpture, adjusts it, instinctively responsive to pigments, colours and materials, resolving their conflicts, bringing them together. In this way the studio is also an arena in which controlled ...

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The Artist’s Studio & the Market. (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

rosa sp1 Artists despite being under the spell of the muse, were under pressure to sell their art to make a living, unless they were economically self-sufficient. To use Bätschmann’s terminology, the artist was caught between self-expression and the market. However, Bätschmann looks mainly at the situation from the late eighteenth-century onwards, but perhaps the conflict first emerges in the previous century with the Italian artist Salvator Rosa. Rosa came from Naples, and because of the lack of interest in his art, he was obliged to remove to Rome, and after that, Florence. We may also encounter in Rosa the first independent ...

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ACLU conference at Lewis & Clark law school addresses Indian criminal issues (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

Indian Country Today reported on the October 29 American Civil Liberties Union Northwest Civil Liberties conference at Lewis & Clark Law School.

The conference put on a two-hour panel entitled “Access to justice for Native American and Alaska Native Women.”

The speakers included Troy Eid, former U.S. attorney for Colorado, Barbara Creel, a citizen of the Pueblo of Jemez and associate professor at the University of New Mexico School of Law, Tawna Sanchez, Shoshone-Bannock, the director of Family Services at the Native American Youth Association, and David Voluck, an attorney and chief judge of the Sitka Tribe of Alaska.

Robert ...

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Law & Order in Indian Country (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

The Green Bay Press Gazette writes today about criminal law issues in Indian Country and President Obama signing the Tribal Law and Order Act in July 2010.

The paper quoted some of the statistics the President recounted that led Congress to enact the law. “It is unconscionable that crime rates in Indian Country are more than twice the national average and up to 20 times the national average on some reservations,” Obama said in bolstering the case for the legislation. “And all of you believe, like I do, that when one in three Native American women will be raped in ...

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International law conference at Lewis & Clark Law School (Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

An interesting history-related post from Native America, Discovered and Conquered:

Lewis and Clark Law School in Portland Oregon is holding a conference on April 15, 2011 entitled – The Future of International Law in Indigenous Affairs: The Doctrine of Discovery, the United Nations, and the Organization of American States.

Here’s a link to the conference internet home page. It will be updated as information about registration and other matters becomes available.

http://www.lclark.edu/law/law_reviews/lewis_and_clark_law_review/spring_symposium/

Confirmed speakers:

Professor Jacinta Ruru (NZ)
Professor Tracey Lindbergh (Can)
Professor Maria Campbell (Can)
Professor Val Napoleon (Can)
Professor Sarah Morales (Can)
Professor Lindsay Robertson (US)
Professor Rebecca Tsosie (US)
Tim Coulter (US -Indian Law Resource Center)
Professor ...

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Papal Majesty at the V & A: Raphael’s Cartoons and Vatican Tapestries. (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

I've recently been down in London attending exhibitions and symposia.

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One exhibition that I was determined to see was the Raphael show at the V&A which unites the artist's gouache cartoons with four of the tapestries from the Vatican. Commissioned by the Medici pope, Leo X, the cartoons were used by Flemish weavers to create the tapestries, probably for both acoustical and propaganda purposes in the Sistine Chapel. The tapestries were first displayed in the Sistine Chapel in 1519, and there have been subsequent reconstructions in later years, notably 1983. The current unification of cartoons and tapestries is bathed in ...

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