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Posts Tagged ‘age’

Kings 8 & 9 (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

Sorry….I have been neglecting this blog of late! More on Kings, connoisseurs and collectors over at the other place.

Frans_Francken_(II),_Kunst-_und_Raritätenkammer_(1636)

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New This Month: April Part 1 (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

This month we expand our industrial revolution content with a look at causes and preconditions, and the often overlooked issue of banking and finance. We also have snapshots of two key figures: Richard Arkwright and Abraham Darby I...

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Why Did Russia give Crimea to Ukraine? (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

Some of the press surrounding the recent acquisition of Crimea by Russia included the statement that they were changing borders established in the aftermath of World War 2. However, Crimea was transferred to the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic by the Russian Soviet Federation in 1954. The reason why is indistinct, and Mark Kramer, Director of the Cold War Studies Program at Harvard University, has posted his deduction via the Wilson Center website. If you want the shorthand, Khrushchev used sending Crimea to Ukraine to gather support in his battle for power after Stalin's death.

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"She Loves You" (History Matters: Historical Musings of Jared Frederick)

An interesting history-related post from History Matters: Historical Musings of Jared Frederick:

The Beatles on The Ed Sullivan Show
 

Having participated this week in the wonderful international Beatles conference "It was 50 Years Ago Today," I felt it an opportune time to reflect on the Fab Four's first big show over here "across the pond."  As you may know, tonight marks the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ American debut on CBS’s The Ed Sullivan Show.  In the half century since, this particular program has been heralded as a hallmark moment in television history as a turning point in communication, culture, and music.  Millions gathered around their rabbit-eared ...

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The Creation(ist) Tour in a Secular Age: Reprise of an RiAH Classic. Or: Why There is Almost No HOpe for America. (Religion in American History)

An interesting history-related post from Religion in American History:

Editorial Note: Our esteemed co-blogmeister Randall Stephens is enjoying the fruits of his success presently at a conference at Oxford, and as a result this month doesn't have time to pay his taxes to "the little people" who run this blog. As a result,  and since we are in re-run season anyway, I am reposting one of his contributions from May of last year.
It is especially appropriate to post this now since I just had the great pleasure of hanging out here in Colorado Springs with my buddy Sarah Posner, who was here working for a story for ...

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Iron Age Gaming Pieces (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

If you're interested in gaming (the older kind with physical pieces rather than the digital), you might like a picture on this Science Daily article. They're reporting on a dig at an Iron Age hillfort in the UK, and among plenty of artefacts like spearheads and brooches, they found "gaming pieces." There's a good picture, and they'll be familiar to players of modern games, especially the dice.

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Europe in the Age of Louis XIV (1661-1715): A Bibliography (Military History)

An interesting history-related post from Military History:

Reblogged from International History:

INTERNATIONAL POLITICS AND WARFARE IN THE LATE MIDDLE AGES AND EARLY MODERN EUROPE

A Bibliography of Diplomatic and Military Studies

by William Young

Chapter 6 – Europe in the Age of Louis XIV (1661-1715)

Europe in the Age of Louis XIV (1661-1715): A Bibliography (pdf)

Useful list of books, journal articles, essays in English about European warfare and diplomacy during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.

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Iron Age find in Romanian Highway (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

Work is progressing in Romania on the Orastie-Sibiu highway, and the construction has been planned in association with the Romanian National History Museum. According to 'Romania Insider', eleven sites of archaeological interest have been identified, and work has begun on excavating them. One key discovery is two hundred pieces of bronze and iron which date to the ninth to eighth centuries BC. They're parts from jewellery, weapons and equipment, and are being billed as one of the most important finds in the country to date.

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Remains of Bronze Age Culture Found in Caucasus (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

A joint Russo-German expedition to the Russian regions of the Caucasus has discovered the remains of a previously forgotten Bronze Age civilization. Dating back to between the sixteenth to fourteenth century BC, the remains cover sixty miles, with stone built architecture and bronze items, and are in good condition. The researchers worked from black and white pictures taken during the era of communist Russia, allied to modern systems like GPS. The BBC has more details...

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Age of Exploration (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

Starting with a desire to reach Asia as overland trade routes dried up, explorers from Europe traveled West. Christopher Columbus made four voyages to the Americas, not realizing even upon his death that he has been to an entirely new continent. The years 1492 - 1585 saw many voyages by the Spanish, Portuguese, French, and English as they explored and conquered territory from North to South. Their main objectives were the three G's: Gold, God, and Glory. Unfortunately, many native americans were killed either by disease or by conquest over the years. In the end, England, France, and Spain became ...

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Sea walk yields Stone Age Axe (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

Sometimes I write these news reports just because I wish it had happened to be. Alan Price, a carer with a background in archaeology, went for a walk on the shores of Orkney recently, and discovered an interesting object on the beach: part of a Palaeolithic axe which could be anywhere from 100,000 to 450,000 years old. Such axes are rare, especially in Scotland, and apparently amazed the archaeologists he took it too. The Scotsman's got a quote from Aberdeen University lecturer Carlin Wickham-Jones explaining "If it really comes from Orkney, it would change our understanding of the whole ...

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Bronze Age Battlefield Found? (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

Archaeologists may have found evidence of the earliest known battlefield in European history. A study published in Antiquity takes a look at excavations in the Tollense Valley in Germany, where roughly a hundred bodies have been found. Signs of a violent death are common among the remains, and there is little to suggest the bodies had a formal burial (the BBC has a picture of one of the skulls). Although we have remains showing signs of violence that date before the Tollense skeletons (from c. 1200 BC), this looks like it might be the earliest known battlefield in Europe.

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Horatio Hornblower DVD Series Takes Viewer Back to the Age of Sail (American Revolution & Founding Era)

An interesting history-related post from American Revolution & Founding Era:

Many years ago, as an 8th grader, I was assigned to read a literary novel. When I asked my parents for a recommendation, my dad suggested C.S. Forester's classic Horatio Hornblower series. He knew I liked military history, and thought C.S. Forester's literary masterpiece would be perfect. He was right! The book I chose was Beat to Quarters, and I could hardly put it down. Shortly thereafter, my dad introduced me to the movie Captain Horatio Hornblower, starring Gregory Peck. I ended up watching that film more than a few times! And, over the next few years, I ...

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Dark age haunting in the County Durham (Beachcombing's Bizarre History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Beachcombing's Bizarre History Blog:

Beachcombing likes to think of the little village of Shincliffe sometimes as night is falling, particularly if it’s raining. True, he’s never been to this particular corner of the north of England. But he’s done the next best thing – looked at google earth and several OS maps. And he suspects that he knows it as well as any other non-visitor.

His fascination in this obscure Co. Durham settlement stems from its name, which has not changed substantially from when it was first recorded almost a thousand years ago.

C. 1110 it was written Schinneclif. And as this is and ...

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