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Archive for December, 2011

50th Anniversary of Navy SEAL Teams (Naval History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from Naval History Blog:

January 1st, 1962 Commissioning  of SEAL Teams ONE and TWO         January 1st, 2012 marks the 50th anniversary of the commissioning of the first Navy SEAL teams.  At the same time of the SEAL commissionings, the Navy also recommissioned Underwater Demolition Team (UDT) 22.  The Navy’s renewed committment to these amphibious forces was commemorated in the [...]

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Donor gives €1 million to restore a pyramid in Rome (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

Pyramid of Gaius CestiusJapanese businessman Yuzo Yagi will donate €1 million ($1.3 million) to restore the tomb of Gaius Cestius, a marble-clad pyramid built in Rome between 18 and 12 B.C. Egyptian style had become a fad in Rome following Octavian’s conquest of Egypt in 30 B.C., and the wealthy Gaius Cestius, who in life had been praetor, tribune of the plebs and a member of the Septemviri Epulonum, a religious college responsible for throwing banquets for the gods, left instructions in his will that a pyramid be built in 330 days to house his remains.

Built out of brick-faced concrete ...

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Abraham Lincoln’s Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

In 1863, Abraham Lincoln created a Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction that applied to all Confederate lands. Its goal was to look forward to the end of the war and how the rebelling states and individuals would be allowed back into the union. Learn about this document with this article that looks at its key provisions and impact.

...

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Presidential Assassinations and Assassination Attempts (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

Since the founding of the United States, four Presidents have been assassinated while in office. An additional six presidents were subject to assassination attempts. President Gerald Ford was actually subject to not just one but two assassination attempts, both by women. Learn more about each assassination and attempt on President of the United States.

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“Hail now the joyful day!” (Boston 1775)

An interesting history-related post from Boston 1775:

It’s a Boston 1775 tradition each New Year’s season to quote one of the verses that printers’ apprentices carried around and distributed at that time of year, soliciting tips.

This year’s verse comes from the shop of the Pennsylvania Evening Post, which Benjamin Towne (c. 1740-1793) launched in January 1775—a most newsworthy year, as it turned out. Philadelphia was the largest and most dynamic city in British North America, so Towne had a lot of competition. His strategy was to publish three times a week instead of just once or twice, and to support the radical Whigs.

The ...

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Happy New Year! (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

Triumph of Bacchus
Bacchus sees in the new year. Poussin’s Triumph of Bacchus, Nelson-Atkins Museum, Kansas, c. 1636-7.

 

AHT wishes all its readers a happy and prosperous 2012!

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Ten Key Facts About George Washington (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

George Washington is a fascinating and heroic figure in America's past. Born on February 22, 1732, he was the Commander of the Continental Army, president of the Constitutional Congress, and of course the first president of the United States. Learn more with these 10 Key Facts to Know About George Washington.

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The Year in History Blog History (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

Mr. Murphy dropped a note through the contact form last week suggesting that I write a Year in Review entry, a summary of the most popular posts both in views and comments, favorite stories, favorite referrals, all that good stuff. I thought that was a brilliant notion, especially since the Christmas-to-New Year’s interregnum can be something of a news desert. Strangely, I haven’t had much trouble finding stories to blog about this holiday season, but I’m still doing the review because it’s a great idea that I hope to make a year-end tradition.

Pedant note: I’m going to refer to ...

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Fake Titles 3.0 (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:

Randall Stephens

You can never come up with enough fake titles. Someone has even created a fake title generator. (Here's what I got from the site: Oppressing, Representing, Protesting: Sexuality in George Orwell and the Cultural Ego of Relic in Animal Farm.) So, once again, here are a few fake titles in religious studies and American religious history. (I like to get some ideas from journal titles found on Project Muse.)

White Elephant Gifts of the Spirit: TV Preachers in the 1990s

The Prevangelicals: Pietists, Preachers, and Divinity
Pedlars in the Early Modern West

Local Weathermen and ...

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“Heroic pieces found in his pocket” (Boston 1775)

An interesting history-related post from Boston 1775:

One of my doorways into eighteenth-century history was Christopher Seider, the young boy fatally shot in a riot in Boston on 22 Feb 1770.

After Christopher’s death, the Boston Evening-Post reported the event in unusual detail and concluded:
…all the friends of Liberty may have an opportunity of paying their last respects to the remains of this little hero and first martyr to the noble cause, whose manly spirit (after the accident happened) appeared in his discreet answers to his Doctor, his thanks to the clergyman who prayed with him, and the firmness of mind he showed when he ...

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The Famous Daily Launches (USHistoryBlog.com)

An interesting history-related post from USHistoryBlog.com:

Last weekend, the Famous Daily (http://famousdaily.com/) launched.  The Famous Daily shows us what makes today special through highlighting important events that occurred on this date in history.

The information featured in the famous daily includes:

-Today's Famous Birthdays showing which famous person celebrates a birthday today
-Today's History which shows 5 key events from history that occurred on this date
-A Famous Quote that was said on this day in history
-Today's holiday and the location in the world it is celebrated
-Today's famous event in sports, entertainment, and geography

The Famous Daily is published on the web ...

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The Famous Daily Launches (USHistoryBlog.com)

An interesting history-related post from USHistoryBlog.com:

Last weekend, the Famous Daily (http://famousdaily.com/) launched.  The Famous Daily shows us what makes today special through highlighting important events that occurred on this date in history.

The information featured in the famous daily includes:

-Today's Famous Birthdays showing which famous person celebrates a birthday today
-Today's History which shows 5 key events from history that occurred on this date
-A Famous Quote that was said on this day in history
-Today's holiday and the location in the world it is celebrated
-Today's famous event in sports, entertainment, and geography

The Famous Daily is published on the web ...

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Origins of some Stonehenge Rocks Confirmed (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

A study by Leicester University and the National Museum of Wales has been able to confirm a link between stones at Stonehenge and Craig Rhos-y-felin in Pembrokeshire. It had long been suspected that the 'rhyolites' had come from the region, but a yearlong study of rock samples has pinpointed the location to a small radius.

...

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Library Staff Find Stash of Ancient Coins (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

I love stories like this: a custodian called Tanja Hols was working at the Passau Historic State Library in Germany when she found a wooden box which had been left for many years. When she opened it, she found a collection of 172 gold and silver coins, many dating back to the ancient Greek, Roman and Byzantine eras. The coins' value is easily in six figures, and staff believe the box was deposited in the library c. 1803, in order to avoid handing church assets over to the state. The personal side of this story is that Hols is going ...

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Google Donates to Bletchley Park (About.com European History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com European History:

Bletchley Park was the centre of the Allied code-breaking effort during the Second World War, and its widely believed to have shortened the war by a couple of years (thanks to giving insight into what Hitler was doing, an especially valuable set of information because Hitler's strange decisions were hard to predict).

...

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Yeti finger turns out to be human after all (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

In 1958 mountain climber and explorer Peter Byrne was in Nepal on the second year of a three year Yeti-seeking expedition funded by adventurer, philanthropist and oil millionaire Tom Slick Jr. In a Buddhist monastery in Pangboche, a small village in the Sola Khumbu region of the central Himalaya, Byrne learned from a temple lama that the monastery just happened to have the hand and skullcap of a Yeti. The custodian showed him a large, crusty, oily, blackened hand with curled fingers and long fingernails.

Byrne asked if he could have it but the lamas refused because its loss would ...

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Recollections of Full Years (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


You can read Nellie Taft's autobiography online, full text, for free if you like. I'm not thrilled with the readability (and I personally actually own this book), but for reference it is great and hey, free is good!

Here is an excerpt on meeting William Howard Taft:
I didn't meet my husband until I was eighteen years old. We had been bom and brought up in the same town; our fathers were warm friends and had practised law at the same bar for more than forty years ; during that time our mothers had exchanged visits, and my sister ...

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Literature and Secularization: At MLA and in Print (RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY)

An interesting history-related post from RELIGION IN AMERICAN HISTORY:


by Everett Hamner

For any of you blog readers who might be at MLA (program is linked here) rather than AHA in a few days(gasp!), there's a session you won't want to miss. Several of the mostprovocative, insightful scholars at the intersection of religion and literaturewill be participating on a panel entitled "Literature andSecularization" (Friday, 3:30-4:45, WSCC 617). Facilitated by SusannahBrietz Monta (Notre Dame, and editor of Religionand Literature), this roundtable will feature Lori Branch (Iowa, author of Rituals of Spontaneity); John Cox (HopeCollege, Seeming Knowledge: Shakespeareand Skeptical Faith); Tracy Fessenden (Arizona State, Culture and Redemption...

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A Restoration Too Far (Art History Today)

An interesting history-related post from Art History Today:

4stanne
Leonardo da Vinci, Virgin, Child and St Anne, Louvre, c. 1510.

 

Well, things have come to a pretty pass when eminent French curators refuse to associate themselves with the procedures of the Louvre. The Guardian reports that Ségolène Bergeon and Jean-Pierre Cuzin no longer agree with the cleaning treatment of one of the Louvre’s treasures- Leonardo’s Virgin and St Anne. Bergeon, an eminent expert on the cleaning of pictures said: "I can confirm that I have resigned from the international consultative committee, but my reasons I am reserving for a meeting with the president-director of the Louvre, Henri ...

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Once Again with the Presidential Oath (Boston 1775)

An interesting history-related post from Boston 1775:

In an attempt to argue that George Washington added the phrase “So help me God” to his presidential oath in 1789, David Barton wrote at Wallbuilders about the fact that some states included that phrase as part of their oaths for office-holders at the time. In particular:
At that time, New York law required that “the usual mode of administering oaths” be followed (i.e., “So help me God”) and that the person taking the oath place his hand upon the Gospels and then kiss the Gospels at the conclusion of the oath.33 (Like the other states, these provisions remained ...

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Thomas Jefferson and his Hair: Can Jefferson’s Hair Unlock Some of History’s Mysteries? (American Revolution and Founding Era)

An interesting history-related post from American Revolution and Founding Era:

Thomas Jefferson died in 1826, yet it's possible that some of his hair survives to the present day. Those who claim to own hair from Thomas Jefferson include the Library of Congress, the Academy of Natural Sciences, and the Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello. If the hair owned by these organizations is indeed Jefferson's, then we have access to the actual DNA of Thomas Jefferson himself. Could that mean we may unravel some of history's mysteries surrounding our nation's third President, including solving the paternal question of Eston Hemings (Sally Hemings's son) once and for all?

The Thomas Jefferson Foundation ...

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Tower of Babel floor plan and elevation (The History Blog)

An interesting history-related post from The History Blog:

The Tower of Babel steleA stele from the collection of Norwegian businessman Martin Schoyen includes the clearest image of Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar II extant and the earliest images of the Great Ziggurat of Babylon, aka Etemenanki, the leading candidate for the Biblical Tower of Babel. This is one of only four known images of Nebuchadnezzar, and the other three are carved on cliff-faces in Lebanon and have been hard used by the elements. The stele shows the king in profile, wearing the conical hat of royalty, holding a staff in his left hand and an unknown object that might be a foundation nail ...

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Pet Trivia con’t (American Presidents Blog)

An interesting history-related post from American Presidents Blog:


Don't know yesterday's answers? Check out this site!

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What Were the Federalist Papers? (About.com American History)

An interesting history-related post from About.com American History:

When it became obvious that the Articles of Confederation were too weak to last, individuals came together at the Constitutional Congress. The result was the US Constitution. However, not everyone ...

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